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Case Studies by Anne-Marie Carrick

66 case studies

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published: 28 Jun 2010

  • Topic: Entrepreneurship
  • Industry: Farm management services; Industrial instruments
  • Region: Europe

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Abstract:
This case tells the story of successful corporate entrepreneurship bringing sustainable value innovation to agribusiness. It recounts the history of EADS-Astrium, subsidiary Infoterra and the development of a new product-service called Farmstar to help farmers reduce costs and increase yields. The case describes the creation of uncontested market space through the successful development of an innovative product that increases private benefits (profits) on adoption. Farmstar also generates public benefits (lowers pollution) by reducing the negative externalities of intensive agriculture. The process of simultaneously increasing public and private benefits through productivity increase and cost reduction is known as sustainable value innovation (SVI).

Pedagogical Objectives:
Describing the quest to achieve SVI, the case demonstrates the importance of i) identifying and assessing reliable trends across geographies and traditional industrial sectors when defining long-term strategic objectives; and ii) nurturing effective operational partnerships that span the technology life cycle of research, development and commercialisation.

Keywords:
Corporate Entrepreneurship, Precision Agriculture, Agribusiness, Remote Sensing, Cooperatives, Induced Innovation, Eco-Efficiency, Sustainable Value Innovation

Prizes won:
- Runner Up of 2010 oikos Case Writing Competition, Corporate Sustainability Category

published: 01 Jan 2001

  • Topic: Strategy
  • Industry: Automobile components
  • Region: Asia

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Abstract:
Case A: describes the creation and development of a joint venture (Ferodo Thailand Ltd) between the UK-based auto components firm T&N Plc, its long-time associate the Japanese brake manufacturer; Japanese Brake International (JBI), and the Thai Boonpong Group. It follows the problems encountered during the first year of the jv in particular the friction between the partners caused by different management styles and cultural differences. Problems of low morale among the workforce and low production arise. The Thai Managing Director, under pressure from both the UK and Thai partner, finally, with almost no notice, resigns.

Pedagogical Objectives:
It illustrates how objectives and methods are sources of conflict in partnerships when the human resources dimension is not accounted for. It raises questions about strategic choices for the future and explores the difficulties of managing cross-cultural relationships. Case A and B can be used as separate cases. A condensed version of case B is available to be used uniquely as a follow on case to case A.

Keywords:
Cultural Differences, Marketing, Asia, Hrm, Cross Cultural Management, Automobile Components, Technology Transfer, Conflict Management, Trust

Related:

published: 01 Jan 2001

  • Topic: Strategy
  • Industry: Automobile components
  • Region: Asia

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Abstract:
Case B: looks at how T&N bring a new management team, including for the first time a marketing director, in the hope of raising morale, improving market share and increasing productivity all this in the wake of the Asian crisis. It traces the new management team’s efforts to turn the joint venture around.

Related:

published: 01 Jan 2001

  • Topic: Strategy
  • Industry: Automobile components
  • Region: Asia

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Abstract:
Please refer to part A for the abstract

Related:

published: 02 May 2019

  • Topic: Leadership & Organisations
  • Region: Europe

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Abstract:
Digital transformations require foundations. Placing advanced technologies on top of poor organizational structures and processes is not likely to work. Digital transformation may involve long-term strategic and organizational development to create a solid foundation that can properly absorb and develop digital initiatives. The case describes the Italian insurance company Generali Italia’s digital journey, from integrating its fragmented offering to transforming the company based on three pillars: discipline, simplicity and focus.

Pedagogical Objectives:
To understand the wider work that may be required as part of digital transformation.

Keywords:
Organizational Change, Digital Transformation, Organization Culture, Retooling / Training, Insurance

published: 29 Nov 2011

  • Topic: Entrepreneurship
  • Industry: consumer electronic goods
  • Region: Global

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Abstract:
Case A describes the development from concept to production of the world's first and smallest hand-held espresso machine. It shows the importance the role of prototyping plays in developing an innovative product, capturing the phases and decisions involved along the design path. The machine is ready for tooling and the CEO of Nielsen Innovation must decide to bring the product to market. Should it be licensed as they had done with other products they had designed? Or should they create a stand-alone business? Case B describes how and why the team started a spin-off company for the Handpresso machine, and managed to grow the business in a short space of time.

Pedagogical Objectives:
The case reviews some simple principles in product innovation. It can be used to discuss the notion of "recombination" of existing ideas and how it leads to novel and useful products. Case A teaches the crucial role of prototyping to communicate ideas among stakeholders in the innovation process (not only within the development team but also with customers and potential partners). It highlights the role of prototyping in enabling design iterations (as an intrinsic part of the innovation process). Case B discusses the options available to capture the value of Handpresso. Taking a structured approach to "monetize" a good idea, it looks at the pros and cons of licensing vs. "do it yourself".

Keywords:
Product Innovation, Licensing, Retail, New Business Development, Protyping, Entrepreneurship, Product Design, Business Model Innovation

Related:

published: 29 Nov 2011

  • Topic: Entrepreneurship
  • Industry: consumer electronic goods
  • Region: Global

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Abstract:
Case A describes the development from concept to production of the world's first and smallest hand-held espresso machine. It shows the importance the role of prototyping plays in developing an innovative product, capturing the phases and decisions involved along the design path. The machine is ready for tooling and the CEO of Nielsen Innovation must decide to bring the product to market. Should it be licensed as they had done with other products they had designed? Or should they create a stand-alone business? Case B describes how and why the team started a spin-off company for the Handpresso machine, and managed to grow the business in a short space of time.

Pedagogical Objectives:
The case reviews some simple principles in product innovation. It can be used to discuss the notion of "recombination" of existing ideas and how it leads to novel and useful products. Case A teaches the crucial role of prototyping to communicate ideas among stakeholders in the innovation process (not only within the development team but also with customers and potential partners). It highlights the role of prototyping in enabling design iterations (as an intrinsic part of the innovation process). Case B discusses the options available to capture the value of Handpresso. Taking a structured approach to "monetize" a good idea, it looks at the pros and cons of licensing vs. "do it yourself".

Keywords:
Product Innovation, Licensing, Retail, New Business Development, Protyping, Entrepreneurship, Product Design, Business Model Innovation

Related:

published: 24 Mar 2014

  • Topic: Entrepreneurship
  • Industry: consumer electronic goods
  • Region: Global

Show details ...

Abstract:
Case A describes the development from concept to production of the world's first and smallest hand-held espresso machine. It shows the importance the role of prototyping plays in developing an innovative product, capturing the phases and decisions involved along the design path. The machine is ready for tooling and the CEO of Nielsen Innovation must decide to bring the product to market. Should it be licensed as they had done with other products they had designed? Or should they create a stand-alone business? Case B describes how and why the team started a spin-off company for the Handpresso machine, and managed to grow the business in a short space of time.

Pedagogical Objectives:
The case reviews some simple principles in product innovation. It can be used to discuss the notion of "recombination" of existing ideas and how it leads to novel and useful products. Case A teaches the crucial role of prototyping to communicate ideas among stakeholders in the innovation process (not only within the development team but also with customers and potential partners). It highlights the role of prototyping in enabling design iterations (as an intrinsic part of the innovation process). Case B discusses the options available to capture the value of Handpresso. Taking a structured approach to "monetize" a good idea, it looks at the pros and cons of licensing vs. "do it yourself".

Keywords:
Product Innovation, Licensing, Retail, New Business Development, Protyping, Entrepreneurship, Product Design, Business Model Innovation

Related:

published: 23 Jun 2014

  • Topic: Entrepreneurship
  • Industry: Consumer electronic goods
  • Region: Global

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Abstract:
This is a condensed version of the Handpresso case series #5841. It describes the development from concept to production of the world's first and smallest hand-held espresso machine. It explains the design process and how the product is brought to market. The CEO of Nielsen Innovation, Henrik Nielsen, decides not to license it as he has with other designs but to create a spin-off company for the Handpresso machine. The final chapter finds the team in a quandary, Henrik Nielsen’s untimely death leaves his wife at the helm. With two new machines ready for launch within a couple of months, it describes how the product is brought to market through partnerships and alliances. Having made a conscious decision to take this route, an agreement is signed with leading coffee roaster Lavazza, who in turn negotiates an exclusive agreement with the auto giant Fiat.

Pedagogical Objectives:
The overall objective is to show how to move from a “good idea” to a “good business” – in other words, how to capture value from an innovation and then build this through an alliance portfolio.

Keywords:
Product Innovation, Licensing, Retail, Partnerships, Alliances, Entrepreneurship, Product Design, Business Model Innovation

Related:

published: 29 May 2017

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Abstract:
In 2011, Partners Group is nearing the end of a year-long quest for a new mandate from a European pension fund, Future Plan. The fund has struggled with its 6-year old PE programme, consistently falling short of its target allocation to the asset class and generating poor returns, seemingly always one step behind the opportunity in the market. Future Plan has built its PE programme by investing in closed-end funds of PE products managed by two executives, one focused on European markets, the other on global markets. But the fallout from the global economic crisis wreaked havoc with Future Plan’s PE programme and something has to change. With an interest in expanding its PE activity to include secondary and direct investment strategies, Future Plan begins a manager search process with one goal in mind: to achieve the target return to the asset class by 2014. The case charts Partners Group’s role in the selection process and how its expertise and services, along with a novel holding structure, offer a way to achieve Future Plan’s goals.

Pedagogical Objectives:
This case provides a ringside seat to follow the actions taken by a medium-sized pension fund when managing its private equity portfolio allocation. Students explore the rationale behind making investment decisions, the key challenges faced by institutional investors when constructing and managing a PE portfolio, and compare the characteristics of primary, secondary and direct PE investments. The case provides data and a step-by-step guide for students to develop an investment strategy (across these three categories) that will enable Future Plan to hit its target allocation to PE by year-end 2014 and achieve its goals.

Keywords:
Private Equity, Partners Group, Pension Fund, Institutional Investor, Portfolio Construction, Portfolio Management, Portfolio Optimization, Target Asset Allocation, Global Financial Crisis, Direct Investment, Secondary Investment, Primary Fund Commitment, Limited Partner, Private Equity Programme

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