INSEAD the business school for the world

Case Studies by Anne-Marie Carrick

65 case studies

by Publication Date
published: 24 Apr 2015

Show details ...

Abstract:
Emerging markets are challenging and require special expertise. India in particular is known to be a tricky business environment. The case follows two senior executives from Alvarez & Marsal’s India practice as they deal with an urgent request from one of their US private equity clients, Sapphire Capital. A former employee is claiming that irregular activities by senior management are at the root of the company’s financial difficulties. The turnaround team needs to act quickly yet must tread carefully in case the accusations prove unfounded. The second part of the case describes how the A&M team deals with the situation and the action they take to restore and restructure the ailing Indian company.

Pedagogical Objectives:
When times are good, (almost) anyone can lead; it is leading at difficult times that separates the wheat from the chaff. This case provides the opportunity for professionals to try their hand at a challenging turnaround situation in which financial distress is exacerbated by allegations of fraud. Add India, the setting, to the mix and it could be described as a 'perfect storm'.

Keywords:
Turnaround, Textile, Cash Flow Management, Emerging Markets, Corporate Governance, India, Distressed Companies, Fraud, Corporate Governance, Investors, Stakeholders and Accountability, Gpei, Gpei-Case

Prizes won:
- Winner 2015 EFMD Case Writing Competition, Indian Management Issues and Opportunities Category

Related:

published: 23 Jun 2014

  • Topic: Entrepreneurship
  • Industry: Consumer electronic goods
  • Region: Global

Show details ...

Abstract:
This is a condensed version of the Handpresso case series #5841. It describes the development from concept to production of the world's first and smallest hand-held espresso machine. It explains the design process and how the product is brought to market. The CEO of Nielsen Innovation, Henrik Nielsen, decides not to license it as he has with other designs but to create a spin-off company for the Handpresso machine. The final chapter finds the team in a quandary, Henrik Nielsen’s untimely death leaves his wife at the helm. With two new machines ready for launch within a couple of months, it describes how the product is brought to market through partnerships and alliances. Having made a conscious decision to take this route, an agreement is signed with leading coffee roaster Lavazza, who in turn negotiates an exclusive agreement with the auto giant Fiat.

Pedagogical Objectives:
The overall objective is to show how to move from a “good idea” to a “good business” – in other words, how to capture value from an innovation and then build this through an alliance portfolio.

Keywords:
Product Innovation, Licensing, Retail, Partnerships, Alliances, Entrepreneurship, Product Design, Business Model Innovation

Related:

published: 24 Mar 2014

  • Topic: Entrepreneurship
  • Industry: consumer electronic goods
  • Region: Global

Show details ...

Abstract:
Case A describes the development from concept to production of the world's first and smallest hand-held espresso machine. It shows the importance the role of prototyping plays in developing an innovative product, capturing the phases and decisions involved along the design path. The machine is ready for tooling and the CEO of Nielsen Innovation must decide to bring the product to market. Should it be licensed as they had done with other products they had designed? Or should they create a stand-alone business? Case B describes how and why the team started a spin-off company for the Handpresso machine, and managed to grow the business in a short space of time.

Pedagogical Objectives:
The case reviews some simple principles in product innovation. It can be used to discuss the notion of "recombination" of existing ideas and how it leads to novel and useful products. Case A teaches the crucial role of prototyping to communicate ideas among stakeholders in the innovation process (not only within the development team but also with customers and potential partners). It highlights the role of prototyping in enabling design iterations (as an intrinsic part of the innovation process). Case B discusses the options available to capture the value of Handpresso. Taking a structured approach to "monetize" a good idea, it looks at the pros and cons of licensing vs. "do it yourself".

Keywords:
Product Innovation, Licensing, Retail, New Business Development, Protyping, Entrepreneurship, Product Design, Business Model Innovation

Related:

published: 24 Mar 2014

Show details ...

Abstract:
Vendex KBB is at crisis point at the end of 2004, especially its flagship V&D department stores. A consortium of private-equity investors led by KKR, who bought the business a year earlier, persuade retail veteran Tony DeNunzio to take on the challenge of turning the diversified holding company around. Reluctant at first, he agrees, but only for three years and thereafter for 18 months part time. His mandate is clear: to turn around the iconic Dutch business by adding value to all stakeholders, not just the PE firm, a mission made more difficult by the reputation PE firms have recently acquired as 'barbarians at the gate'. About to embark on his first 100 days, what should he do on his first day?

Pedagogical Objectives:
The case and films demonstrate how good leadership in a crisis, together with a clear turnaround plan, can save an ailing company. They underline the importance of the first 100 days after taking over. Difficult decisions need to be taken for the future of the company, but in the end they pay off, and communication with all stakeholders is key. The case can be used to illustrate that it can be easier to turn around a company under private ownership with a strong financial focus, and that PE takeovers can be less about “milking the cow” than adding value for all stakeholders, not just investors.

Keywords:
Turnaround, Crisis Management, Private Equity, Leadership, Entrepreneurship, Retail, Corporate Governance, Value Creation, Strategy and Implementation, European Competitiveness, Europe, Gpei, Gpei-Case

published: 24 Feb 2014

  • Topic: Entrepreneurship
  • Industry: IT
  • Region: Europe

Show details ...

Abstract:
Case B takes up entrepreneur Yann Lechelle's story in 2006. Etheryl is a success and Yann is maintaining the all-important work/life balance. When two recent graduates from INSEAD offer to buy the company, the case follows the painful selling process and shows how his role changes. The focus then switches to Yann's new ventures: from an all-consuming venture, Kickyourapps, that has him working 20 hours a day, to his current company Appsfire where work/life balance is restored. It looks at the different vehicles for funding and approaches to raising finance.

Pedagogical Objectives:
The case focus is the challenge of transitioning from a lifestyle venture to a growth venture. It presents possible paths and outlines several financing and organisational alternatives to grow the venture. The case emphasizes the trade-off between resource leverage and control.

Keywords:
Lifestyle Entrepreneur, Venture Growth, Application Service Provider, Resource Leverage, Apps, European Competitiveness, Europe

Related:

published: 26 Feb 2013

Show details ...

Abstract:
Case A describes the creation and growth of Nuru Energy. Starting from nothing, the founder 'bootstraps' a social venture with the goal of providing affordable and effective lighting solutions for 800 million people without access to the electricity grid in sub-Saharan Africa and India. The case narrates the challenges involved in developing a social enterprise with a dual aim of turning a profit and making a social impact. It focuses in particular on the financial challenge and provides a context to discuss difference financing options and their implications. It looks at the different business model alternatives - market-based and donor-based. The central theme is to assess the merits and drawbacks of the different funding alternatives. Case B is an update that explains what financing option the founder chose and its implications. It sets the stage for a discussion about trade-offs in the geographical expansion of social ventures. to access case videos and other support material.

Pedagogical Objectives:
The teaching objectives are for students to: - understand the emerging and diverse field of social investment (from donors to impact investors) - realise the importance of a sustainable business model and how it can be developed - discuss the role of the social entrepreneur, how to achieve focus and avoid burn-out

Keywords:
Energy, Entrepreneurship, Sustainability, Social Impact, Social Entrepreneurship, Hybrid Organizations, Africa, Impact Investing

Prizes won:
- Winner of 2012 EFMD Case Writing Competition, African Business Cases Category
- Runner Up of 2012 oikos Case Writing Competition, Social Entrepreneurship Category

Related:

published: 26 Feb 2013

Show details ...

Abstract:
Case A describes the creation and growth of Nuru Energy. Starting from nothing, the founder 'bootstraps' a social venture with the goal of providing affordable and effective lighting solutions for 800 million people without access to the electricity grid in sub-Saharan Africa and India. The case narrates the challenges involved in developing a social enterprise with a dual aim of turning a profit and making a social impact. It focuses in particular on the financial challenge and provides a context to discuss difference financing options and their implications. It looks at the different business model alternatives - market-based and donor-based. The central theme is to assess the merits and drawbacks of the different funding alternatives. Case B is an update that explains what financing option the founder chose and its implications. It sets the stage for a discussion about trade-offs in the geographical expansion of social ventures. to access case videos and other support material.

Pedagogical Objectives:
The teaching objectives are for students to: - understand the emerging and diverse field of social investment (from donors to impact investors) - realise the importance of a sustainable business model and how it can be developed - discuss the role of the social entrepreneur, how to achieve focus and avoid burn-out.

Keywords:
Energy, Entrepreneurship, Sustainability, Social Impact, Social Entrepreneurship, Hybrid Organizations, Africa, Impact Investing

Prizes won:
- Winner of 2012 EFMD Case Writing Competition
- Runner Up of 2012 oikos Case Writing Competition, Social Entrepreneurship Category

Related:

published: 29 Nov 2011

  • Topic: Entrepreneurship
  • Industry: consumer electronic goods
  • Region: Global

Show details ...

Abstract:
Case A describes the development from concept to production of the world's first and smallest hand-held espresso machine. It shows the importance the role of prototyping plays in developing an innovative product, capturing the phases and decisions involved along the design path. The machine is ready for tooling and the CEO of Nielsen Innovation must decide to bring the product to market. Should it be licensed as they had done with other products they had designed? Or should they create a stand-alone business? Case B describes how and why the team started a spin-off company for the Handpresso machine, and managed to grow the business in a short space of time.

Pedagogical Objectives:
The case reviews some simple principles in product innovation. It can be used to discuss the notion of "recombination" of existing ideas and how it leads to novel and useful products. Case A teaches the crucial role of prototyping to communicate ideas among stakeholders in the innovation process (not only within the development team but also with customers and potential partners). It highlights the role of prototyping in enabling design iterations (as an intrinsic part of the innovation process). Case B discusses the options available to capture the value of Handpresso. Taking a structured approach to "monetize" a good idea, it looks at the pros and cons of licensing vs. "do it yourself".

Keywords:
Product Innovation, Licensing, Retail, New Business Development, Protyping, Entrepreneurship, Product Design, Business Model Innovation

Related:

published: 29 Nov 2011

  • Topic: Entrepreneurship
  • Industry: consumer electronic goods
  • Region: Global

Show details ...

Abstract:
Case A describes the development from concept to production of the world's first and smallest hand-held espresso machine. It shows the importance the role of prototyping plays in developing an innovative product, capturing the phases and decisions involved along the design path. The machine is ready for tooling and the CEO of Nielsen Innovation must decide to bring the product to market. Should it be licensed as they had done with other products they had designed? Or should they create a stand-alone business? Case B describes how and why the team started a spin-off company for the Handpresso machine, and managed to grow the business in a short space of time.

Pedagogical Objectives:
The case reviews some simple principles in product innovation. It can be used to discuss the notion of "recombination" of existing ideas and how it leads to novel and useful products. Case A teaches the crucial role of prototyping to communicate ideas among stakeholders in the innovation process (not only within the development team but also with customers and potential partners). It highlights the role of prototyping in enabling design iterations (as an intrinsic part of the innovation process). Case B discusses the options available to capture the value of Handpresso. Taking a structured approach to "monetize" a good idea, it looks at the pros and cons of licensing vs. "do it yourself".

Keywords:
Product Innovation, Licensing, Retail, New Business Development, Protyping, Entrepreneurship, Product Design, Business Model Innovation

Related:

published: 25 May 2011

  • Topic: Entrepreneurship
  • Industry: Search Funds
  • Region: Global

Show details ...

Abstract:
This note is divided into two sections. In the first part, Simon Webster, widely regarded as the pioneer of search funds in the UK, recounts his experience of creating his first search fund, buying a company in 1995, and selling it for £30 million in 2005, making a great return on investment for himself and his investors. The second part introduces four other European search funders who are at different stages - one who has closed his fund and is about to acquire a company; one who has just closed his fund and is looking for a suitable business to purchase; and two who are at the fundraising stage. A discussion ensues between the search funders of their different approaches, the challenges they face and their own experiences of the model.

Pedagogical Objectives:
The aim is to introduce the search fund model to students (in particular students studying outside the US where the model is still relatively unknown). The discussion between the search funders allows the students to weigh up the pros and cons of the model - is it the right path for them to acquire a company? It gives responses to the questions frequently asked surrounding the search fund model, offering concrete examples of successful funds and some of the pitfalls to avoid. It gives advice on how to approach potential investors, such as whether to have a partner, and the best time in your career to start a fund.

Keywords:
Search Funds, Fundraising, Entrepreneurship, Management Buy-Ins, Corporate Governance, Investors, Stakeholders and Accountability

by Publication Date


Share