INSEAD the business school for the world

Case Studies by Anne-Marie Carrick

65 case studies

by Title
published: 18 Sep 2008

  • Topic: Entrepreneurship
  • Industry: Food Industry
  • Region: Global

Show details ...

Abstract:
This set of two cases describes how two MBA alumni acquired a long-established business in France, and, despite all their efforts to modernise it, grow it and apply best practices as learned in business school (Case A), finally turned it into a loss-making and cash-bleeding company (Case B).

Pedagogical Objectives:
Although the case is rich in all kinds of ?sub-plots?, the three over-arching themes are: - the vital importance of sector experience in acquisitions - change management - financial control, in particular cash management. It has been found very effective to approach the class session using this same sequence.

Keywords:
Entrepreneurship, Acquisition, Change-Management, Re-Structuring, Streamlining, Systems Introduction, Deal Structuring, Gpei, Gpei-Case

Related:

published: 18 Jul 2008

  • Topic: Entrepreneurship
  • Industry: Food Industry
  • Region: Global

Show details ...

Abstract:
This set of two cases describes how two MBA alumni acquired a long-established business in France, and, despite all their efforts to modernise it, grow it and apply best practices as learned in business school (Case A), finally turned it into a loss-making and cash-bleeding company (Case B).

Pedagogical Objectives:
Although the case is rich in all kinds of ?sub-plots?, the three over-arching themes are: - the vital importance of sector experience in acquisitions - change management - financial control, in particular cash management. It has been found very effective to approach the class session using this same sequence.

Keywords:
Gpei, Gpei-Case

Related:

published: 01 Jul 2006

  • Topic: Leadership & Organisations
  • Industry: Hospital
  • Region: Europe

Show details ...

Abstract:
This case examines how Martin McShane, a general practitioner and physician manager at the Moss Valley Medical Centre, changes the mindset of all the key players involved in caring for the elderly and implements a proactive, prevention-oriented care model. McShane is up against all the different elements of the NHS - primary care, social services and acute care. Through skilful management of the various players, he succeeds in smoothly integrating new systems throughout the region. A nurse-led service for tracking hospital admission and discharge of elderly patients is introduced, with systems implemented to improve continuing care of patients and communication between services that ultimately reduce hospital stays and admission rates.

Pedagogical Objectives:
The learning objectives of this case are to: - Understand the process of change and effective leader actions - Become familiar with organizational arrangements to promote service-level integration - Understand mechanisms of power and politics associated with engaging powerful constituents in the organizational change process - Develop strategies to implement externally mandated regulations and service innovation

Keywords:
Leadership, Organisational Change, Service Redesign, Chronic Disease Management, Innovation Adoption, Public Sector Management, Inter-Organisational Collaboration, Hmi, Healthcare Delivery and Management

published: 21 Mar 2008

  • Topic: Leadership & Organisations
  • Industry: Insurance
  • Region: Global

Show details ...

Abstract:
This two-part case study describes the initial merger and cultural transformation of Aviva's Norwich Union (NUI) operation in the UK. It examines the complexities of integration that arose following a series of mergers that created NUI from 1998 to 2000. Case A describes how, after CGU Plc and Norwich Union joined forces to become NUI, top management's priority was to restore profits. Behind the scenes, however, the need for a whole new corporate culture was becoming increasingly imperative. It shows the tension between the need for immediate gains in efficiencies vs. longer-term approaches to the business that required careful nurturing and attention. It ends as the executive team's announcement of the new corporate philosophy - "to be a service provider with insurance at our core and care at our heart" - is greeted with complete disbelief by employees. Case B describes the actions taken to overcome their skepticism and successfully implement the new philosophy - actions that required significant change to the organisational culture.

Pedagogical Objectives:
This case does two things. First, it shows how easy it is for strategy and culture to come apart. In a permanent quest for strategic advantage, top executives seek ways to improve the positioning of the firm in the marketplace, often making major and seemingly sudden decisions on how the firm will play the game against competitors. Once they identify a direction, they expect the change yesterday. If the company culture is important to realising these strategic ends but is not moving in the same direction or is being asked to move too often, misalignment can occur. The second objective - how to go about realigning the culture with the strategy - follows the steps taken by this large organisation in trying to ensure the people and systems support the strategy.

Keywords:
Organisational Behaviour, Culture Change, Corporate Transformation, Leadership, Insurance, Merger, Corporate Governance, Value Creation, Strategy and Implementation

Related:

published: 21 Mar 2008

  • Topic: Leadership & Organisations
  • Industry: Insurance
  • Region: Global

Show details ...

Abstract:
Please refer to part A for the abstract

Keywords:
Organisational Behaviour, Culture Change, Corporate Transformation, Leadership, Insurance, Merger, Corporate Governance, Value Creation, Strategy and Implementation

Related:

published: 29 Oct 2018

  • Topic: Entrepreneurship
  • Region: North America

Show details ...

Abstract:
The case explores the possible acquisition by McKinsey &Company of design company LUNAR in response to the new directions management consulting is taking. As of 2014, a new internal unit included ‘McKinsey implementation’ and ‘digital labs’, which explored new opportunities for the Firm and soon became major growth vectors for the consultancy. Targeting new capabilities and expertise, senior leadership asks the heads of the Product Development Practice (PDP) to “shoot big” if an opportunity arises. Design is one such capability, but how should they bring it on board: A partnership with an existing design company? An outright acquisition? Or by developing organically, hiring designers to work within the company? Ultimately, the acquisition option is chosen as a way to secure proven design talent, a brand, a portfolio, infrastructure and culture. A team within the PDP pitch a proposal to acquire a design company to the McKinsey advisory board, which gives the green light for a pilot test. McKinsey&Company asks LUNAR to host a workshop (for the redesign of a storage cabinet for laptop computers) and is more than impressed with the result. Discussions to acquire the design firm begin, but strategic, organizational and operational issues must be ironed out first. Students are required to assess whether the acquisition option will succeed, whether there is a better route (with respective advantages and disadvantages), and what organizational levers can be used to optimize LUNAR’s integration.

Pedagogical Objectives:
a) The strategic reasoning behind building a firm’s capabilities through an acquisition. How to add new organizational capabilities via an acquisition, what form the acquisition should take, and the advantages/disadvantages involved. b) Using organizational levers (e.g. defining career plans) to structure the new firm’s integration. How best to integrate the new capabilities – in this case design – from the acquired company into the established organization.

Keywords:
Knowledge Services, Design Thinking, Organizational Capabilities, Innovation, Design Capabilities, Creativity, Creative Organizations, Mckinsey, Lunar

published: 26 Feb 2013

Show details ...

Abstract:
Case A describes the creation and growth of Nuru Energy. Starting from nothing, the founder 'bootstraps' a social venture with the goal of providing affordable and effective lighting solutions for 800 million people without access to the electricity grid in sub-Saharan Africa and India. The case narrates the challenges involved in developing a social enterprise with a dual aim of turning a profit and making a social impact. It focuses in particular on the financial challenge and provides a context to discuss difference financing options and their implications. It looks at the different business model alternatives - market-based and donor-based. The central theme is to assess the merits and drawbacks of the different funding alternatives. Case B is an update that explains what financing option the founder chose and its implications. It sets the stage for a discussion about trade-offs in the geographical expansion of social ventures. to access case videos and other support material.

Pedagogical Objectives:
The teaching objectives are for students to: - understand the emerging and diverse field of social investment (from donors to impact investors) - realise the importance of a sustainable business model and how it can be developed - discuss the role of the social entrepreneur, how to achieve focus and avoid burn-out

Keywords:
Energy, Entrepreneurship, Sustainability, Social Impact, Social Entrepreneurship, Hybrid Organizations, Africa, Impact Investing

Prizes won:
- Winner of 2012 EFMD Case Writing Competition, African Business Cases Category
- Runner Up of 2012 oikos Case Writing Competition, Social Entrepreneurship Category

Related:

published: 26 Feb 2013

Show details ...

Abstract:
Case A describes the creation and growth of Nuru Energy. Starting from nothing, the founder 'bootstraps' a social venture with the goal of providing affordable and effective lighting solutions for 800 million people without access to the electricity grid in sub-Saharan Africa and India. The case narrates the challenges involved in developing a social enterprise with a dual aim of turning a profit and making a social impact. It focuses in particular on the financial challenge and provides a context to discuss difference financing options and their implications. It looks at the different business model alternatives - market-based and donor-based. The central theme is to assess the merits and drawbacks of the different funding alternatives. Case B is an update that explains what financing option the founder chose and its implications. It sets the stage for a discussion about trade-offs in the geographical expansion of social ventures. to access case videos and other support material.

Pedagogical Objectives:
The teaching objectives are for students to: - understand the emerging and diverse field of social investment (from donors to impact investors) - realise the importance of a sustainable business model and how it can be developed - discuss the role of the social entrepreneur, how to achieve focus and avoid burn-out.

Keywords:
Energy, Entrepreneurship, Sustainability, Social Impact, Social Entrepreneurship, Hybrid Organizations, Africa, Impact Investing

Prizes won:
- Winner of 2012 EFMD Case Writing Competition
- Runner Up of 2012 oikos Case Writing Competition, Social Entrepreneurship Category

Related:

published: 24 Jul 2017

  • Topic: Strategy
  • Industry: Explosives, Chemical, Mining
  • Region: Global

Show details ...

Abstract:
In March 2015, Alberto Calderon was appointed Managing Director and CEO of Orica, the world’s largest provider of commercial explosives and innovative blasting systems to the mining, quarrying, oil, gas, and construction markets.
The company had been performing badly, with the stock price down and reported losses, even before the recent mining industry downturn. A major asset write-down was needed after the disappointing 2006 acquisition of the ground services business Minova. After cutting costs to restore profitability, Calderon determines that Orica must be strategically repositioned from the largest supplier to the “trusted partner of choice”.
The new positioning holds out some prospect of profitable growth, but simply announcing the intent will not make it happen. The CEO must convey the need to change as well as the rationale for the new positioning, which is so different from the past that new capabilities and new leaders are required. How can he achieve this transformation in the midst of a mining industry downturn when its steel-making customers have over a decade’s worth of excess capacity?

Pedagogical Objectives:
This case is designed to help participants appreciate the challenges of pursuing the strategic repositioning from supplier to partner, of getting management and employees to understand and embrace transformation, and determining and executing the key actions necessary to instil the capabilities and skills required to achieve the vision.

Keywords:
Strategic Transformation, Mining Industry, Chemical Industry, Cultural Change, Restructuring, Leadership

published: 26 Aug 2016

  • Topic: Entrepreneurship
  • Industry: Private Equity
  • Region: Europe

Show details ...

Abstract:
George Bachiashvili, deputy CEO of the Partnership Fund, is asked by the Prime Minister of Georgia to create an investment vehicle funded entirely with private capital for local investments. The goal is to spur foreign investment and stimulate long-term economic growth in the country. Having no precedent for such a vehicle in Georgia, George has to identify best practice from other sources to get it off the ground. Georgia clearly needs capital but is not on the radar of most international investors. However, the US$1 billion anchor investment pledged by the PM with no strings attached gives it some serious chips in the game. Even so, “frontier markets” are among the most challenging contexts in which to raise private funding, as capital deployment is often hindered by an unstable political environment, weak institutions and corruption. The task is daunting but, if successful, could transform the economy. The case describes in detail the different options for finding investors.

Pedagogical Objectives:
Students should be able to address the following issues: 1. Identify the mission of the fund, and the strategic and financial goals behind it. 2. The type of additional investors to be targeted for this type of fund e.g., global or regional, pension funds, funds of funds, sovereign wealth funds, high net worth individuals, family offices, development finance institutions. 3. Draw up a comprehensive investment strategy for such a fund. 4. Identify which private equity fund structure would best enable George to fulfil the fund’s strategic and financial objectives, satisfy the needs of the LP base, and execute his investment strategy.

Keywords:
Private Equity, Georgia, Frontier Martkets, Funds, Gpei, Gpei-Case

by Title


Share