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Case Studies by Anne-Marie Carrick

66 case studies

by Title
published: 26 Aug 2016

  • Topic: Entrepreneurship
  • Industry: Private Equity
  • Region: Europe

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Abstract:
George Bachiashvili, deputy CEO of the Partnership Fund, is asked by the Prime Minister of Georgia to create an investment vehicle funded entirely with private capital for local investments. The goal is to spur foreign investment and stimulate long-term economic growth in the country. Having no precedent for such a vehicle in Georgia, George has to identify best practice from other sources to get it off the ground. Georgia clearly needs capital but is not on the radar of most international investors. However, the US$1 billion anchor investment pledged by the PM with no strings attached gives it some serious chips in the game. Even so, “frontier markets” are among the most challenging contexts in which to raise private funding, as capital deployment is often hindered by an unstable political environment, weak institutions and corruption. The task is daunting but, if successful, could transform the economy. The case describes in detail the different options for finding investors.

Pedagogical Objectives:
Students should be able to address the following issues: 1. Identify the mission of the fund, and the strategic and financial goals behind it. 2. The type of additional investors to be targeted for this type of fund e.g., global or regional, pension funds, funds of funds, sovereign wealth funds, high net worth individuals, family offices, development finance institutions. 3. Draw up a comprehensive investment strategy for such a fund. 4. Identify which private equity fund structure would best enable George to fulfil the fund’s strategic and financial objectives, satisfy the needs of the LP base, and execute his investment strategy.

Keywords:
Private Equity, Georgia, Frontier Martkets, Funds, Gpei, Gpei-Case

published: 26 Aug 2016

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Abstract:
The case describes how the Pro-invest Group – a boutique investment firm specialising in private equity real estate and real estate asset management – built its business and raised a first-time private equity fund. The Pro-invest founders had boot-strapped the business since its inception in 2013, but in-house funds were running out by mid-2014 and they needed third-party capital to take the venture to the next level. After deciding on a suitable fund structure, the Pro-invest team hits the fundraising trail. Turmoil erupts when a potential investor pulls out at the last minute, leaving the team in shock to re-evaluate its fundraising options. The case explores the pros and cons of each option in detail.

Pedagogical Objectives:
The case allows students to evaluate the different options when creating a new fund, and more generally to understand the fundraising options available for PE funds, especially first time funds. They should be able to: 1. Understand the central elements (e.g. control, economics) that private equity fund managers consider when raising capital. 2. Gain insight into the fundraising dynamics in the real estate private equity industry. 3. Step into the shoes of a fund manager’s Management Committee and evaluate the pros and cons of the various fundraising options, from institutional investors to family offices. 4. Appreciate the questions and due diligence requirements of large institutional investors before allocating funds to a real estate PE fund. 5. Appreciate the challenges of balancing the efforts of fundraising and executing investments in parallel, in particular when raising a first-time fund.

Keywords:
Private Equity, Real Estate, Fundraising, Australia, Hotel Industry, First-Time Fund, Fund Structure, Global Financial Crisis, Pere, Family Office, Gpei, Gpei-Case

published: 14 Oct 2016

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Abstract:
The case describes the rise of BlaBlaCar to global leadership of long-haul ridesharing and to prominence as one of Europe's most successful startups. It focuses on a critical juncture when the company has recently emerged as the European leader and has raised $100 million to go global.

Pedagogical Objectives:
The case allows an integrated coverage of most elements of a core strategy course, including: industry analysis, competitive advantage, business models, company value chain, platform dynamics and positive feedback, acquisitions and global expansion. For entrepreneurship, it covers the founding and scaling of a new venture.

Keywords:
Sharing Economy, Global Expansion, Disruption, Platform Strategy, Ridesharing, Green Business, Competitive Strategy, Business Models

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published: 23 Mar 2018

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Abstract:
The Swiss company TAG Heuer, maker of luxury watches, is part of the LVMH group (Moet Hennessy Louis Vuitton). In 2015, CEO Jean-Claude Biver is deciding whether to launch its first-ever fully connected Swiss watch, manufactured in partnership with Google and Intel. Entering this new market presents an unprecedented challenge: making a watch based on a technology (microprocessors) that the Swiss have not mastered. Is TAG Heuer ready to compete in the digital space - and potentially without the traditional 'Swiss Made' label? Case B takes up the story following the successful launch of the TAG Heuer connected watch. Sales are beyond all expectations for the luxury Swiss watchmaker and its partners Intel and Google. There are a few surprises too – the consumers are older than they expected and the watches sell out far quicker than anticipated – hence the company runs into some supply chain issues.

Pedagogical Objectives:
To learn how a nation achieves international success in a specific industry and how multinational corporations enable the emergence of clusters and benefit from them. In particular, how the Swiss luxury watch industry (in particular TAG Heuer) reacted and dealt with the challenge from connected watches such as the Apple Watch. Four key issues are addressed: 1. The importance of the 'Swiss Made' label for this market. 2. How to make a connected watch 'eternal' in the spirit of traditional mechanical watches. 3. How TAG Heuer prepared for a profound digital transformation by learning from the technology cluster in Silicon Valley (locating a team of engineers there and managing the partnership with Google and Intel). 4. How a company dealt with digital disruption in a conservative industry – Swiss watchmaking. 5. How multinationals identify technology in other clusters – “technology scouting” - and set up relevant processes.

Keywords:
Watches, Luxury, Wearables, Connected Watches, Digital Transformation, Google, Intel, Clusters, Jean-Claude Biver, Global Strategy, Digital Disruption, Apple Watch, Swissmade, Silicon Valley, Switzerland

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published: 01 Sep 2006

  • Topic: Strategy
  • Industry: Healthcare
  • Region: Europe

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Abstract:
This case describes how Robert Jones decides to go against the normal NHS practice and employ a full-time orthotist. He was under pressure with longer waiting lists and increasing patient complaints. In addition, the physiotherapy budget was going to be reduced by 3-4%, meaning that cost efficiency was paramount. It was a financial risk as the cost of employing a full-time orthotist was high, but in the long term he was convinced that savings would be made. The case shows how he decides to change practice and how his gamble paid off both financially and through increased customer/patient satisfaction.

Pedagogical Objectives:
- Assess the impact of make-or-buy decisions in terms of financial risk and cost reductions - Calculate changes in system capacity with the manipulation of staff and clinic scheduling to determine the effects on waiting time - Introduce concepts associated with service quality and its measurement within the context of clinical operations/services

Keywords:
Hmi, Healthcare Delivery and Management

published: 25 May 2011

  • Topic: Entrepreneurship
  • Industry: Search Funds
  • Region: Global

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Abstract:
This note is divided into two sections. In the first part, Simon Webster, widely regarded as the pioneer of search funds in the UK, recounts his experience of creating his first search fund, buying a company in 1995, and selling it for £30 million in 2005, making a great return on investment for himself and his investors. The second part introduces four other European search funders who are at different stages - one who has closed his fund and is about to acquire a company; one who has just closed his fund and is looking for a suitable business to purchase; and two who are at the fundraising stage. A discussion ensues between the search funders of their different approaches, the challenges they face and their own experiences of the model.

Pedagogical Objectives:
The aim is to introduce the search fund model to students (in particular students studying outside the US where the model is still relatively unknown). The discussion between the search funders allows the students to weigh up the pros and cons of the model - is it the right path for them to acquire a company? It gives responses to the questions frequently asked surrounding the search fund model, offering concrete examples of successful funds and some of the pitfalls to avoid. It gives advice on how to approach potential investors, such as whether to have a partner, and the best time in your career to start a fund.

Keywords:
Search Funds, Fundraising, Entrepreneurship, Management Buy-Ins, Corporate Governance, Investors, Stakeholders and Accountability

published: 01 Jul 2006

  • Topic: Leadership & Organisations
  • Industry: Hospital
  • Region: Europe

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Abstract:
This case shows how Fiona Jenkins, Head of Physiotherapy for South Devon Health Services, reviewed and redesigned the stroke service care pathway. She had just four months to present a proposal and then implement it in accordance with the National Service Framework (NSF) guidelines. These guidelines specified that a stroke specialist should examine all individuals admitted with a diagnosis of stroke. Her challenge was to coordinate the different stakeholders - primary care, secondary care and social services. In addition, she had to do this without any additional funding. The case describes the different options open to her and how she decides on a plan. Some of the players are suspicious, and even threaten to resign if the plan is implemented.

Pedagogical Objectives:
The learning objectives of this case are to: 1) Understand the process of leading organizational change, with a focus on the sequencing of actions, leadership skills, engagement and input from various stakeholders 2) Know key systems and structures associated with service integration. (i.e., shift from unit to service focus) 3) Understand leadership strategies to engage powerful constituents in the change process 4) Know management practices to promote the implementation of externally mandated regulations/service innovations

Keywords:
Organisational Change, Leadership, Service Redesign, Chronic Disease Management, Health Care Management, Management of Innovation, Staff Role Change, Public Sector Management, Hmi, Healthcare Delivery and Management

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published: 01 Jul 2006

  • Topic: Leadership & Organisations
  • Industry: Hospital
  • Region: Europe

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Abstract:
This case shows how Fiona Jenkins, Head of Physiotherapy for South Devon Health Services, reviewed and redesigned the stroke service care pathway. She had just four months to present a proposal and then implement it in accordance with the National Service Framework (NSF) guidelines. These guidelines specified that a stroke specialist should examine all individuals admitted with a diagnosis of stroke. Her challenge was to coordinate the different stakeholders - primary care, secondary care and social services. In addition, she had to do this without any additional funding. The case describes the different options open to her and how she decides on a plan. Some of the players are suspicious, and even threaten to resign if the plan is implemented.

Keywords:
Hmi, Healthcare Delivery and Management

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published: 04 May 2018

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Abstract:
The case describes how Spanish entrepreneurs Daniel González de Vega and Javier Arroyo founded Smartick with the aim of tackling the poor level of math education in their native Spain. Smartick is a self-financed enterprise that combines social impact with profitability. The two entrepreneurs are up against stiff competition, notably from the education giant Khan Academy, who not only has major financial backing but also offers its service free of charge. After two years of developing and testing a mix of the leading offline methods and state-of-the-art web-based technologies, Smartick is ready to make a big push into the after-school math learning space. Javier and Daniel are mulling over three options for their long-term marketing strategy. They are looking to segment the market and find the right segment to implement the strong brand positioning necessary to impact Spain’s math education culture and society. The three options are to focus on B2B through schools, a combination of B2B and B2C, and a B2C-only approach. They must also decide on a pricing model and a communication strategy.

Pedagogical Objectives:
After the case discussion, students should be able to: - understand the value of a differentiated product, even in the presence of a popular free alternative, - apply a segmentation-targeting-positioning approach to online education specifically, and to any other market or category, - recommend a pricing strategy to match the overall strategy of the company.

Keywords:
Edtech, Online Education, Branding, Marketing, Social Impact, Pricing Models, E-Learning, Entrepreneurship, Segmentation, Targeting, Brand Positioning, Software-As-Service, Brand Identity, Customer Centricity

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published: 29 Mar 2017

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Abstract:
The case describes how Spanish entrepreneurs Daniel González de Vega and Javier Arroyo founded Smartick with the aim of tackling the poor level of math education in their native Spain. Smartick is a self-financed enterprise that combines social impact with profitability. The two entrepreneurs are up against stiff competition, notably from the education giant Khan Academy, who not only has major financial backing but also offers its service free of charge. After two years of developing and testing a mix of the leading offline methods and state-of-the-art web-based technologies, Smartick is ready to make a big push into the after-school math learning space. Javier and Daniel are mulling over three options for their long-term marketing strategy. They are looking to segment the market and find the right segment to implement the strong brand positioning necessary to impact Spain’s math education culture and society. The three options are to focus on B2B through schools, a combination of B2B and B2C, and a B2C-only approach. They must also decide on a pricing model and a communication strategy.

Pedagogical Objectives:
After the case discussion, students should be able to: - understand the value of a differentiated product, even in the presence of a popular free alternative, - apply a segmentation-targeting-positioning approach to online education specifically, and to any other market or category, - recommend a pricing strategy to match the overall strategy of the company.

Keywords:
Edtech, Online Education, Branding, Marketing, Social Impact, Pricing Models, E-Learning, Entrepreneurship, Segmentation, Targeting, Brand Positioning, Software-As-Service, Brand Identity, Customer Centricity

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