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Case Studies by Anne-Marie Carrick

66 case studies

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published: 25 Jan 2016

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Abstract:
The case describes the rise of BlaBlaCar to global leadership of long-haul ridesharing and to prominence as one of Europe's most successful startups. It focuses on a critical juncture when the company has recently emerged as the European leader and has raised $100 million to go global.

Pedagogical Objectives:
The case allows an integrated coverage of most elements of a core strategy course, including: industry analysis, competitive advantage, business models, company value chain, platform dynamics and positive feedback, acquisitions and global expansion. For entrepreneurship, it covers the founding and scaling of a new venture.

Keywords:
Sharing Economy, Global Expansion, Disruption, Platform Strategy, Ridesharing, Green Business, Competitive Strategy, Business Models

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published: 01 Jan 2001

  • Topic: Strategy
  • Industry: Appliance Industry, White Goods
  • Region: Asia

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Abstract:
Case C deals with Whirlpool’s subsequent re-positioning, including conversion of one plant to OEM production and adjustments to its strategy in microwave ovens based on what it had learned about the market (in part from local competitors).

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published: 30 Jun 2008

  • Topic: Leadership & Organisations
  • Industry: Residential Care/ Skilled Nursing Facilities
  • Region: Europe

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Abstract:
In response to changing demographic and financing trends, this case describes the process used by the senior managers of five nursing and residential care facilities in the Noord Limberg region of Holland. This case highlights the role of shared organizational goals, managerial autonomy and collaboration, and organizational governance and design as key factors used to promote the successful merger of five organizations with a history of competition in a small market area.

Pedagogical Objectives:
This case enables participants to: 1) Identify management tactics to promote successful post-merger collaboration 2) Analyse the role of power and politics in aligning managerial interests to promote merger success 3) Compare and contrast financial and organizational motives driving merger decisions

Keywords:
Post-Merger Integration, Organizational Design, Leadership, Healthcare Management, Hmi, Healthcare Delivery and Management, Hmi, Business Science

published: 29 Mar 2011

  • Topic: Entrepreneurship
  • Industry: Baby bottles
  • Region: North America

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Abstract:
This case study can be used as a stand-alone case or in conjunction with INSEAD case study "Brazile Telecom". This case takes up Frank Drummond's story when he decides to leave the telecoms business and return to the US where he starts a new venture to develop a new type of baby bottle. He calls on the designer who he worked with on the one button phone. The case describes how they start by defining the brand values as the first step to develop a tangible product that reflect such values. The case then focuses on the development of an innovative baby bottle - looking at the different aspects involved in the concept, design, manufacture and marketing of an innovative baby bottle that will create value for both the parents and babies alike: from the textures, materials, shape, size of the bottle and teat as well as the packaging.

Pedagogical Objectives:
1) From an entrepreneurship viewpoint, this case series emphasizes the value of focusing on a specific user?s need (e.g. mobile communication for elderly people; transitioning of breast feeding to bottle in babies). It shows the value of focusing on a niche market to develop an innovative solution. It demonstrates the many advantages to starting small and growing one step at a time by creating value in novel ways for a specific market segment. 2) From a product development process viewpoint, these cases helps students understand the challenge of evaluating and selecting product concepts - a critical stage in the concept development phase.

Keywords:
Brand Values, Baby Bottles, Niche Markets, Concept Selection, Product Design, Start-Ups, Innovative Design, Concept Scoring

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published: 28 Jun 2019

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Abstract:
INSEAD alumnus Martin Murray is the inventor of waterdrop™, a cube made up of natural aromas, superfood extracts and vitamins that encourages people to drink more water by adding flavour. Although he initially builds a business on a lean budget, he knows that creating a unique brand is key for the success of his innovation. Not only is waterdrop in a category of its own – ‘a microdrink’ – but, unlike most drinks, the cubes can be sold online. With a product positioning ‘drink more water’, he tests the brand on his native Austrian market. The case follows Martin from the initial idea (prompted by the limited drinks range on-board a flight to Singapore) to recruiting a small team to launch what he believes will be a game-changer in the non-alcoholic beverage industry.

Pedagogical Objectives:
a) Brand identity and positioning for start-ups: How to build a strong brand identity with limited resources, leverage market trends and customer intelligence, and position a brand compared to competitors. b) Digital marketing and branding: How to build a brand across channels on a small budget, create engaging content for target segments, leverage social media for word-of-mouth and community marketing; gamification and mobile strategies. c) Customer-centric strategies: How to leverage consumer insights for new product ideas at low cost, and integrate seamless omni-channel strategies early on. d) Entrepreneurship challenges: Brand or product – deciding which is more important and where to invest resources. The advantages of start-ups (over incumbents) when entering an existing industry. How to grow brands internationally with limited resources; how much brand deviation can be afforded.

Keywords:
Microdrink, Food and Beverage, Digital Disruption, Lean Management, Agile, Entrepreneurship, Brand Identity, Digital Marketing, Digital Branding, Customer Centricity, Sustainability, Health

published: 22 Mar 2019

  • Topic: Operations
  • Industry: Computer industry, Retail
  • Region: North America

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Abstract:
On 15 May 2001, the first Apple retail store was opened to the public at Tysons Corner, Virginia, and the same day a second store was opened in Glendale, California. With retail branded experiences virtually unknown in the industry at the time, the decision to launch the Apple retail programme was greeted with scepticism. However, within the first week they welcomed 7,700 visitors, with sales of almost $600,000 – testimony to its undoubtable success – and went on to roll out another 24 stores. Fifteen years on, there are over 450 Apple stores globally, with higher sales per square foot – $5009 – than any other retail location in the United States. Even today, people still wonder what made them so successful and how it can be replicated. Having successfully designed a brand-defining experience for Apple retail that created immense value, Eight Inc. had to decide how this level of success could be replicated for other potential clients. The case describes the relationship between Apple and Eight Inc., who were initially hired by Apple co-founder Steve Jobs to work on first the MacWorld tradeshows. It traces the steps in the process, from establishing the case to each minute detail in the design process. The case describes how the team built not just a store but a breakthrough branded customer experience.

Pedagogical Objectives:
1. To introduce and analyse a framework to design branded experiences. The case shows how designing a (retail) branded experience is different from designing a space or designing a service, and supersedes the latter. It also shows the business value that can be created through branded experiences. 2. The role of brand values in guiding the design principles for all the elements that contribute to the user experience. Understanding what those brand values are and how they are perceived by the target user is crucial in the design process. 3. A branded experience is the engagement of the user with the brand through the products/services, communication messages, the staff (and other users) behaviours, and the physical (and digital) space. The management of the experience design process requires an approach that combines modular and integrative principles. While the design of products/services, communication, behaviours and space are typically done separately by different disciplines, the integration of all these elements must be considered throughout the process so that they combine to create a holistic experience. The design of the Apple retail stores was not just an example of a good experience design, it was a breakthrough in the computer, technology and retail space. This provides a rich context to discuss the key success factors behind creating an outstanding branded user experience. One was the level of deep and detailed involvement of top-level management throughout the process, critical in defining the brand values that guided the rest of the design process and enabling the team to push the boundaries.

Keywords:
Innovation, Design, Retail, Experience Design, Computing Industry, Organizational Transformation

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