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Case Studies by Gianpiero Petriglieri

32 case studies

published: 25 Sep 2017

  • Topic: Leadership & Organisations
  • Region: North America

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Abstract:
Frédéric and Fiona Bonner follows the relationship and careers of an investment banker and a tech entrepreneur as their personal and professional lives unfold. It hinges on the dilemma they face ten years into their marriage and with two young children, as job opportunities pull them to different sides of the United States. The case invites students to explore their opinions about Frédéric and Fiona’s life and careers to date, their successes, failures and trade-offs, and their options going forward. By doing so it creates a space for students to reflect on and discuss their experiences and expectations of “managing” the interplay between work, love, and family in their lives. The case challenges students to examine how they define success professionally and personally; how, with, and for whom they make major decisions; whether they can “have it all” and what that might look like.

Pedagogical Objectives:
This case is about the tension between the wish to manage and the risk of being managed by love and work. It is best suited to a course in organisational behaviour or career management. Presenting a scenario that many students will see as a potential dilemma, it allows them to proactively think about the rewards and challenges of dual-career relationships. It is particularly useful to surface students’ definitions and markers of success—for themselves as individuals, for their careers, and for their families—and the implications of those definitions. A successful class discussion will explore relationship, family and career issues from the perspective both of individuals and of the couple. Themes that can be covered include: • What success means personally, relationally and professionally; • The difference between making decisions “in” or “as” a couple; • The interplay of, and boundaries between, love lives and working lives; • Common experiences in dual-career couples: competition, sacrifice, trade-offs and relationship neglect; • Whether it is possible to “have it all” and what “having it all” means. The case discussion can help to normalise experiences and concerns that students may find difficult and enable them to examine the values that impact the way they structure and experience their relationships and careers.

Keywords:
Career Transitions, Dual-Career Couples, Work-Life Balance, Careers, Having-It-All

published: 28 May 2018

  • Topic: Responsibility
  • Industry: Technology
  • Region: North America

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Abstract:
In April 2018, after it became known that Google was collaborating with the US Department of Defense on Project Maven, over 3,000 employees signed an internal memo asking CEO Sundar Pichai to (a) cancel the project immediately, and (b) enforce a policy stating that the company would never build warfare technology. Project Maven had been launched in early 2017 as part of the DoD’s efforts to integrate AI and machine learning into its defense strategies. Drones, robots and AI were increasingly deployed in intelligence gathering and combat operations in what was considered a 21stcentury “arms race.” While Google described its role as “non-offensive,” the memo argued that involvement in Project Maven might hurt its reputation and ability to attract talent at a time when public trust in technology was waning. The (A) case puts students in the shoes of a recent hire faced with the choice of signing the memo. It also invites them to consider how they would respond, as CEO, to such a petition against one of the company’s contracts. After outlining what happened in the weeks after the internal controversy was made public, the (B) case raises the question of whether Google had “done the right thing” (its new motto) in discontinuing the project.

Pedagogical Objectives:
The Google and Project Maven case series can be used with MBA and executive audiences in modules on Responsible Leadership, Ethics, and Innovation. The purpose of the case is not necessarily to debate the merits of collaborations between private and public sector, including the military, which are widespread. It aims instead to help students reflect on their roles as citizens and leaders of companies and society—on the opportunities and obligations that come with both, especially when pursuing innovation. More and more companies attract talent with the promise of work that will give them personal meaning and allow them to make a positive difference in the world. Once they do, nothing is “just business”. This brings to the surface ethical and practical dilemmas at the social, organizational, and personal level. The case offers an opportunity to explore all three levels, touching on themes related to the relationship between business and government, the responsibilities of a global organization and its leaders, and the expression, encouragement and management of debate and dissent.

Keywords:
Responsible Leadership, Ethics, Artificial Intelligence, Digital Disruption, Google, Project Maven, Drones, Public Private Partnership, Corporate Social Responsibility, Ethical Dilemma, Sundar Pichai, Us Department of Defense, Don’t Be Evil, Larry Page

Prizes won:
- Winner 2018 EFMD Case Writing Competition, Responsible Leadership

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published: 30 Jul 2018

  • Topic: Responsibility
  • Industry: Technology
  • Region: North America

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Abstract:
In April 2018, after it became known that Google was collaborating with the US Department of Defense on Project Maven, over 3,000 employees signed an internal memo asking CEO Sundar Pichai to (a) cancel the project immediately, and (b) enforce a policy stating that the company would never build warfare technology. Project Maven had been launched in early 2017 as part of the DoD’s efforts to integrate AI and machine learning into its defense strategies. Drones, robots and AI were increasingly deployed in intelligence gathering and combat operations in what was considered a 21st century “arms race.” While Google described its role as “non-offensive,” the memo argued that involvement in Project Maven might hurt its reputation and ability to attract talent at a time when public trust in technology was waning. The case puts students in the shoes of a recent hire faced with the choice of signing the memo. It also invites them to consider how they would respond, as CEO, to such a petition against one of the company’s contracts.

Pedagogical Objectives:
The purpose of the case is not necessarily to debate the merits of collaboration between private and public sector. Rather, it asks students to reflect on their opportunities and obligations as citizens and leaders of companies and society when pursuing innovation. As companies increasingly attract talent with the promise of work that has personal meaning and allow individuals to make a positive difference in the world, nothing is “just business.” This trend brings to the surface ethical and practical dilemmas at the social, organizational, and personal level. The case offers an opportunity to explore all three levels, touching on the relationship between business and government, the responsibility of a global organization and its leaders, and the expression, encouragement, and management of debate and dissent.

Keywords:
Responsible Leadership, Ethics, Artificial Intelligence, Digital Disruption, Google, Project Maven, Drones, Public Private Partnership, Corporate Social Responsibility, Ethical Dilemma, Sundar Pichai, Us Department of Defense, Don’t Be Evil, Larry Page

Prizes won:
- Winner 2018 EFMD Case Writing Competition, Responsible Leadership

Related:

published: 03 Jan 2006

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Abstract:
The Katelyn Neilson, MBA case follows the personal and professional development of a young "high-potential" within an intensive one-year, full-time MBA programme. Katelyn's background and resume, significant excerpts from her diary, and an evocative picture drawn to visualize her major dilemmas, provide vivid illustrations of the unfolding of a major life transition.

Pedagogical Objectives:
The core themes in the case are personal and professional development, and the dynamics of life transitions. It is most useful at times when students are considering changes in career or personal direction. It also provides the opportunity to introduce reflective activities on the student's own situation, on the trajectory of their life, and on the dilemmas they may be encountering, or expect the encounter on their path. Work life balance, coaching, and gender differences in life transitions can also be addressed.

Keywords:
Life Transition, Mba, Career Transition, High Potentials, Personal Development, Professional Development, Work Life Balance, Coaching, Women

published: 27 May 2013

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Abstract:
“Ten Years Later” is a series of one-page narratives that provide a glimpse of “what happened next” in the lives of a group of members of the INSEAD MBA graduating class of 2002. The narratives, recounted by female and male graduates of different nationalities and aspirations, give students a flavour of how life can turn out for people who have 'sat in their seats' before.

Pedagogical Objectives:
This is a case about definitions of success and failure. It helps instructor and students to explore questions that can only be answered personally: Where am I going? What am I looking for? What do I want with my life? The purpose of this is to explore these questions so students can act more purposefully or mindfully in their future choices.

Keywords:
Work-Life Balance, Career Aspirations, Post-Mba Career Choices, Meaning of Life, Ambition, Vocation, Life Plan, Future Selves

published: 12 Mar 2018

  • Topic: Leadership & Organisations

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Abstract:
The Executive Challenge is an experiential exercise in resolving two challenges that executives need to master to become competent leaders. The first is processing and making decisions on complex and delicate issues with limited information. The second is dealing sensitively with other people, including taking and offering accurate feedback. The roleplay pack for groups of 5 is no. 6376; for groups of 6 is no. 6377; for groups of 7 is no. 6378.

Pedagogical Objectives:
The exercise gives students the opportunity to put themselves in executive shoes and practice handling issues and decisions that senior managers deal with on a daily basis. It allows them to practice behavioural observation skills, and giving and receiving feedback. This exercise allows students to: • Sense the pressure executives face balancing multiple demands in limited time. • Reflect and get feedback on their management style; give feedback to others on their styles. • Implement management skills and strategies taught in previous classes. • Experience how they take up management roles in relation to others.

Keywords:
Experiential Exercise, Decision Making, Management Skills, Management Strategies

Related:

published: 12 Mar 2018

  • Topic: Leadership & Organisations

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Abstract:
The Executive Challenge is an experiential exercise in resolving two challenges that executives need to master to become competent leaders. The first is processing and making decisions on complex and delicate issues with limited information. The second is dealing sensitively with other people, including taking and offering accurate feedback. The roleplay pack for groups of 5 is no. 6376; for groups of 6 is no. 6377; for groups of 7 is no. 6378.

Pedagogical Objectives:
The exercise gives students the opportunity to put themselves in executive shoes and practice handling issues and decisions that senior managers deal with on a daily basis. It allows them to practice behavioural observation skills, and giving and receiving feedback. This exercise allows students to: • Sense the pressure executives face balancing multiple demands in limited time. • Reflect and get feedback on their management style; give feedback to others on their styles. • Implement management skills and strategies taught in previous classes. • Experience how they take up management roles in relation to others.

Keywords:
Experiential Exercise, Decision Making, Management Skills, Management Strategies

Related:

published: 12 Mar 2018

  • Topic: Leadership & Organisations

Show details ...

Abstract:
The Executive Challenge is an experiential exercise in resolving two challenges that executives need to master to become competent leaders. The first is processing and making decisions on complex and delicate issues with limited information. The second is dealing sensitively with other people, including taking and offering accurate feedback. The roleplay pack for groups of 5 is no. 6376; for groups of 6 is no. 6377; for groups of 7 is no. 6378.

Pedagogical Objectives:
The exercise gives students the opportunity to put themselves in executive shoes and practice handling issues and decisions that senior managers deal with on a daily basis. It allows them to practice behavioural observation skills, and giving and receiving feedback. This exercise allows students to: • Sense the pressure executives face balancing multiple demands in limited time. • Reflect and get feedback on their management style; give feedback to others on their styles. • Implement management skills and strategies taught in previous classes. • Experience how they take up management roles in relation to others.

Keywords:
Experiential Exercise, Decision Making, Management Skills, Management Strategies

Related:

published: 12 Mar 2018

  • Topic: Leadership & Organisations

Show details ...

Abstract:
The Executive Challenge is an experiential exercise in resolving two challenges that executives need to master to become competent leaders. The first is processing and making decisions on complex and delicate issues with limited information. The second is dealing sensitively with other people, including taking and offering accurate feedback. The roleplay pack for groups of 5 is no. 6376; for groups of 6 is no. 6377; for groups of 7 is no. 6378.

Pedagogical Objectives:
The exercise gives students the opportunity to put themselves in executive shoes and practice handling issues and decisions that senior managers deal with on a daily basis. It allows them to practice behavioural observation skills, and giving and receiving feedback. This exercise allows students to: • Sense the pressure executives face balancing multiple demands in limited time. • Reflect and get feedback on their management style; give feedback to others on their styles. • Implement management skills and strategies taught in previous classes. • Experience how they take up management roles in relation to others.

Keywords:
Experiential Exercise, Decision Making, Management Skills, Management Strategies

Related:

published: 12 Mar 2018

  • Topic: Leadership & Organisations

Show details ...

Abstract:
The Executive Challenge is an experiential exercise in resolving two challenges that executives need to master to become competent leaders. The first is processing and making decisions on complex and delicate issues with limited information. The second is dealing sensitively with other people, including taking and offering accurate feedback. The roleplay pack for groups of 5 is no. 6376; for groups of 6 is no. 6377; for groups of 7 is no. 6378.

Pedagogical Objectives:
The exercise gives students the opportunity to put themselves in executive shoes and practice handling issues and decisions that senior managers deal with on a daily basis. It allows them to practice behavioural observation skills, and giving and receiving feedback. This exercise allows students to: • Sense the pressure executives face balancing multiple demands in limited time. • Reflect and get feedback on their management style; give feedback to others on their styles. • Implement management skills and strategies taught in previous classes. • Experience how they take up management roles in relation to others.

Keywords:
Experiential Exercise, Decision Making, Management Skills, Management Strategies

Related:


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