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Case Studies by Jason P. Davis

7 case studies

published: 29 Oct 2018

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Abstract:
When Alibaba, China’s leading digital platform and cloud-based services company, fails to acquire the US firm Moneygram, CEO Jack Ma decides to go it alone and develop a digital strategy using blockchain technology as the basis for a global remittance service, GCash, within its cloud services business. Alibaba’s financial services affiliate Ant Financial, begins by targeting cross-border money transfers made by domestic workers in Hong Kong who routinely send money to their families in the Philippines. It subsequently forms a strategic alliance with Globe Telecom and Standard Chartered Bank which provide market access and financial intermediation. The case focuses on the value proposition of blockchain in cross-border financial services, particularly in Southeast Asia, and how it fits into Alibaba's "iron triangle" cloud services strategy in the region where there is fierce competition from Google and Digital Ocean. Blockchain technology is utilized to disintermediate the US-based SWIFT system and the dominant remittance service providers, Moneygram and Western Union, that charge high fees. As an illustration of how to launch proprietary cypto- and blockchain-based networks, the case explains how they differ from digital platforms, and how they are complementary, such as network effects and synergies with Alibaba’s installed customer base.

Pedagogical Objectives:
The case study incorporates important lessons in digital entrepreneurship, digital strategy, blockchain, cloud and web services, fintech, network effects, and diversification across technology platforms.

Keywords:
Digital Entrepreneurship, Blockchain, Cloud, Cloud Service, Fintech, Remittances, Network Effects, Crypto, Alibaba, Web Services, Fintech, Southeast Asia, China, Hong Kong, Philippines, Digital Strategy, Digital Platform, Platforms

published: 31 May 2019

  • Topic: Entrepreneurship
  • Region: Global

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Abstract:
ByteDance, the Chinese company behind TikTok, the viral short video app, made headline news when its valuation jumped to $75 billion, surpassing Uber ($72 billion) to become the world’s most valuable start-up. ByteDance leveraged capabilities in consumer-focused artificial intelligence (AI) to become one of the first Chinese Big Tech digital platforms to succeed outside China, notably in the US and India. The case focuses on the strategic value of predictive AI on the supply and demand sides of digital content, illustrating how AI-based tools enable the production of viral content and customized delivery and consumption. It compares the Chinese and US approach to AI, drawing a distinction between their implementation and innovative capabilities. Other issues include the internationalization of digital platforms, notably the management of inappropriate and illegal content in the respective institutional settings, and China’s unique approach to content filtering that combines AI with human censors. Competition with China’s other Big Tech companies - Tencent and Baidu - is also discussed. The case can also be used as a general introduction to artificial intelligence, including a brief history of AI (Section 2), categorization of AI applications (Section 3), and a comparison of AI in China and the US (Section 4).

Pedagogical Objectives:
This case teaches important lessons about artificial Intelligence, digital entrepreneurship, digital strategy, managing user-generated content, the globalization of big tech companies, and emerging markets.

Keywords:
Artificial Intelligence, Ai, Digital Entrepreneurship, Digital Strategy, Machine Learning, Emerging Markets, User-Generated Content, Platforms, Video, Mobile Apps, China, India, United States, Big Tech

published: 27 Feb 2017

  • Topic: Entrepreneurship
  • Industry: Telecoms, connected traffic cloud
  • Region: Europe

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Abstract:
The case describes how telecom giant Ericsson’s Intelligent Transport Systems (ITS) team developed the Connected Traffic Cloud (CTC) due be launched at the prestigious Mobile World Congress. The CTC solution had already created a huge buzz internally. Competition was tough to be selected for launch at this annual conference, witness to the solution’s huge potential for Ericsson’s expansion into new arenas. All the customers the team hoped to reach were present at the conference. The timing was also good as the six year project in Germany where Ericsson had partnered with a consortia on ITS had reached its final stages with positive results in the domain. For the CTC solution to be successful building an ecosystem would be essential be it with road authorities, auto manufacturers, service providers or IT companies the possibilities were endless. The case discusses the challenges Ericsson faced constructing this ecosystem and options for monetizing the innovative solution. It was a new and complex landscape for Ericsson to navigate but with 140 years in the telecom space the company had global scale and local presence required for the ITS domain. Auto manufacturers were looking to redefine their value chains with cars becoming connected and automated, and were therefore investing in communication and cloud solutions.

Pedagogical Objectives:
Students should gain an understanding of what makes an ecosystem - what partnerships, what service / product offerings, and what business model. They should be able to answer the following questions: • What are the biggest risks of Ericsson’s current approach to Connected Traffic Cloud? • How are competitors likely to respond or enter this space when it matures? • What are the key modifications that Ericsson must make to create and capture value in this space?

Keywords:
Corporate Entrepreneurship, Connected Traffic Cloud, Infrastructure, Sweden, Intelligent Transport Systems, Transport, Networked Society, Connected Vehicle Cloud, The Internet of Things

published: 23 Apr 2018

  • Topic: Entrepreneurship
  • Industry: Digital Platform, Mobile Application, Logistics, Ride-Sharing, Food Delivery
  • Region: Asia
  • Website: https://cases.insead.edu/go-jek

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Abstract:
Go-Jek, a ride-sharing, food-delivery and logistics company, was the first ‘unicorn’ startup (private company valued over $1 billion) to be founded in Indonesia. Case (A) focuses on the launch of Go-Jek as a mobile ride-sharing and food delivery platform, the network effects, and the digital disruption of existing taxi drivers. Case (B) describes the competition with digital entrants Uber and Grab and with incumbent taxi companies, and its use of funds from Sequoia, Rakuten, KKR, Temasek, Tencent, and Google to compete. Case (C) explores Go-Jek’s product experimentation in financial services with the Go-Pay wallet, potential international expansion and the ultimate goal to achieve 'super app' status (like Alipay and Wechat in China) in Southeast Asia.

Pedagogical Objectives:
This case series offers lessons in digital entrepreneurship, launching platforms, network effects, platform competition, product experimentation, internationalization by start-ups, and diversification to become a 'super app'.

Keywords:
Digital Entrepreneurship, Platforms, Network Effects, Experimentation, Ride-Sharing, Transportation and Logistics, Lean Startup, Two-Sided Market, Indonesia, Southeast Asia, Singapore

Related:

published: 23 Apr 2018

  • Topic: Entrepreneurship
  • Industry: Digital Platform, Mobile Application, Logistics, Ride-Sharing, Food Delivery
  • Region: Asia
  • Website: https://cases.insead.edu/go-jek

Show details ...

Abstract:
Go-Jek, a ride-sharing, food-delivery and logistics company, was the first ‘unicorn’ startup (private company valued over $1 billion) to be founded in Indonesia. Case (A) focuses on the launch of Go-Jek as a mobile ride-sharing and food delivery platform, the network effects, and the digital disruption of existing taxi drivers. Case (B) describes the competition with digital entrants Uber and Grab and with incumbent taxi companies, and its use of funds from Sequoia, Rakuten, KKR, Temasek, Tencent, and Google to compete. Case (C) explores Go-Jek’s product experimentation in financial services with the Go-Pay wallet, potential international expansion and the ultimate goal to achieve 'super app' status (like Alipay and Wechat in China) in Southeast Asia.

Pedagogical Objectives:
This case series offers lessons in digital entrepreneurship, launching platforms, network effects, platform competition, product experimentation, internationalization by start-ups, and diversification to become a 'super app'.

Keywords:
Digital Entrepreneurship, Platforms, Network Effects, Experimentation, Ride-Sharing, Transportation and Logistics, Lean Startup, Two-Sided Market, Indonesia, Southeast Asia, Singapore

Related:

published: 23 Apr 2018

  • Topic: Entrepreneurship
  • Industry: Digital Platform, Mobile Application, Logistics, Ride-Sharing, Food Delivery
  • Region: Asia
  • Website: https://cases.insead.edu/go-jek

Show details ...

Abstract:
Go-Jek, a ride-sharing, food-delivery and logistics company, was the first ‘unicorn’ startup (private company valued over $1 billion) to be founded in Indonesia. Case (A) focuses on the launch of Go-Jek as a mobile ride-sharing and food delivery platform, the network effects, and the digital disruption of existing taxi drivers. Case (B) describes the competition with digital entrants Uber and Grab and with incumbent taxi companies, and its use of funds from Sequoia, Rakuten, KKR, Temasek, Tencent, and Google to compete. Case (C) explores Go-Jek’s product experimentation in financial services with the Go-Pay wallet, potential international expansion and the ultimate goal to achieve 'super app' status (like Alipay and Wechat in China) in Southeast Asia.

Pedagogical Objectives:
This case series offers lessons in digital entrepreneurship, launching platforms, network effects, platform competition, product experimentation, internationalization by start-ups, and diversification to become a 'super app'.

Keywords:
Digital Entrepreneurship, Platforms, Network Effects, Experimentation, Ride-Sharing, Transportation and Logistics, Lean Startup, Two-Sided Market, Indonesia, Southeast Asia, Singapore

Related:

published: 31 Aug 2018

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Abstract:
Grab, Uber and Go-Jek compete in ride-hailing and related logistics and transport services (e.g., food delivery, courier service) across Southeast Asia, including Indonesia, Philippines, Vietnam, Thailand, Malaysia and Singapore. The case focuses on differences in company history and strategy, and how they shape the competition and ultimately performance differentials. The goal is to illustrate the dynamics of platform-based competition across a region. Issues covered include network effects, achieving scale, one-country focus versus expansion in an interconnected region, technological standardization versus localization, mutual forbearance and real options across product features and market geographies, and how equity ownership and control drive consolidation in platform ecosystems.

Pedagogical Objectives:
The case offers lessons in digital entrepreneurship, platform competition, network effects, internationalization strategy, technology standards, mutual forbearance, real options, market consolidation, and equity ownership and control.

Keywords:
Digital Entrepreneurship, Platforms, Competition, Network Effects, Mutual Forebearance, Real Options, Ride-Sharing, Ride-Hailing, Two-Sided Market, Southeast Asia, Indonesia, Singapore, Malaysia, Uber, Grab, Go-Jek


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