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Case Studies by Pierre Chandon

27 case studies

published: 28 May 2014

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Abstract:
Yue Sai is L’Oreal’s troubled Chinese luxury brand. Alexis Perakis-Valat, the new CEO of L’Oréal China, has made it a point of honor to turn the brand around. He has asked Stéphane Wilmet, the brand’s new general manager, to come up with a turnaround plan that will restore L’Oréal’s reputation in China as the world’s best cosmetic marketer. Stéphane Wilmet and Ronnie Liang, Yue Sai’s marketing director, must reconsider everything from Yue Sai’s value proposition down to its media, price, product, and distribution strategies.
Please visit the dedicated case website to to watch commercials and video interviews.

Pedagogical Objectives:
The case shows the challenges that even very successful multinational firms experience when doing business in China. Specific topics discussed include: 1. Functional vs. emotional branding. Can all brands become “passion” brands? Should they? 2. Effects of country of origin, national pride, traditions and cultural beliefs in today’s China. 3. Marketing “masstige” (affordable luxury) brands. How to leverage brand heritage while staying current and relevant in a fast-moving market.

Keywords:
Marketing, Cosmetics, China, Luxury, Branding, Beauty, Advertising

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published: 14 Jan 2010

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Abstract:
Unilever is a solid leader in the Brazilian detergent powder market with an 81% market share. Laercio Cardoso must decide (1) whether Unilever should divert money from its premium brands to target the lower-margin segment of low-income consumers, (2) whether Unilever can reposition or extend one of its existing brands to avoid launching a new brand, and (3) what price, product, promotion, and distribution strategy would allow Unilever to deliver value to low-income consumers without cannibalizing its own premium brands too heavily.
Instructors can access video interviews with the managers mentioned in the case, television commercials, and PowerPoint presentations to be used in the classroom or as handouts on the dedicated case website using the login and password mentioned in the teaching note.

Pedagogical Objectives:
This case deals with the question of whether marketing and branding create value for really poor consumers. It can therefore be used in an MBA, executive education or undergraduate core course on marketing management to illustrate the value of marketing and the marketing approach, or in a brand management course to explore the frontiers of branding. This case can also be used in a consumer behaviour course to examine the motivations and decision-making process of low-income consumers. Alternatively, it can be used in a global marketing or global strategy and management course to study the way multinational companies adapt their strategy to compete in emerging countries.

Keywords:
Media Support, Branding, Low-Income Consumers, Marketing, Poverty, New Product Introduction, Break-Even Analysis, Advertising, Pricing, Poor, Distribution, Promotion, Product, Powder, Detergent, Guimaraes, Brazil, Unilever

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published: 25 Jun 2018

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Abstract:
When 3G Capital bought Burger King from TPG, Bain Capital and Goldman in 2010, the fastfood chain was losing momentum. By 2014, the business was back in growth mode but the Burger King brand was still lacking lustre and it was unclear if the celebrity-heavy ad campaign would work. Could new CEO Daniel Schwartz and his team make the brand cool again - on the cheap? Drawing on data from a brand audit, the challenge is to (i) define the brand’s identity and choose among five positioning ideas; (ii) allocate expenses between television, digital and PR, and brand and restaurant redesign. For the digital and PR components, for example, students have to evaluate eight mock-ups created by Burger King’s agency, and come up with their own ideas for Burger King to evaluate.
Please visit the dedicated case website to access supplementary material.

Pedagogical Objectives:
This decision-oriented case touches on key aspects of brand marketing for quick-service restaurants, a category at the intersection of consumer goods and retailing. Instructors have access to uniquely detailed information about process, actions and outcomes in a 29-page teaching note, 20 exclusive video interviews with the management team, a comprehensive slide deck, as well as high-resolution ads and video footage explaining the success of Burger King’s award-winning campaigns (“Whopper Freakout”, “Proud Whopper”, “The McWhopper Proposal”, and “Google Home of the Whopper”), which won it “Creative Marketer of 2017” , multiplied the value of the brand by 3.7 since its acquisition, and accelerated the company’s growth. Suitable for undergraduates, graduates, and seasoned executives, the case will fit into an introductory course in marketing management as well as specialized courses in marketing strategy, brand management, consumer behavior, digital marketing, or retailing. It can also be taught in a business strategy course on the impact of private equity ownership, or a finance/accounting course on the implementation of zero-based budgeting. For a single session, we suggest instructors make brand positioning an additional pre-discussion reading and focus class discussion on TV advertising, social media, and PR. For a double session, add the brand identity decoding and the positioning decision. With more sessions, the instructor can address design and restaurant image, or dive deeper into each aspect covered.

Keywords:
Marketing, Food, Advertising, Branding, Digital, Design, Packaging, Social Media, Public Relations, Health, Private Equity, Zero-Based Budgeting

published: 06 Jun 2018

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Abstract:
Chocolate candy marketers like Mars, Nestlé, Hershey and Ferrero are under pressure to respond to the stricter nutritional targets set by governments, changing consumer tastes, and competition from healthier brands like Kind or Cliff. Should traditional chocolate makers reformulate their products with less sugar content (and if so, should they announce it)? Should they reduce portion or package sizes (and if so, should they reduce prices)? More generally, is obesity their responsibility? Is collaboration with competitors, researchers and advocacy groups the solution? How can they grow their business without contributing to the obesity epidemic?
Please visit the dedicated case website to access supplementary material.

Pedagogical Objectives:
This case examines whether food marketing can be a force for good in helping to align business with consumer health and pleasure. It addresses key issues such as how to manage food claims (and perceptions) and downsizing in a category disrupted by start-ups like Kind. A comprehensive teaching note and detailed PowerPoint presentation divulge the latest research findings in this domain – e.g., on the causes and consequences of obesity, health halos, perceptions of portion size, and ‘epicurean nudging’ (or how focusing on pleasure, not health, can make people happier to spend more on food yet eat less).

Keywords:
Food, Marketing, Nutrition, Health, Packaging, Portion Size, Chocolate, Innovation, Retailing, Responsibility, Sustainability, Ethics, Branding, Regulation

Prizes won:
- Third Prize in the Corporate Sustainability track of oikos Case Writing Competition 2018

published: 01 Jan 2004

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Abstract:
Renzo Rosso, the president and founder of Diesel SpA, the innovative Italian casual wear company famous for its controversial 'For Successful Living' advertising campaign, is pondering how to brand its new upscale line of clothing: StyleLab. The objectives set for StyleLab are: (1) to enter the new and attractive high casual wear market; (2) to create an aura of prestige for the core D-Diesel line; and (3) to provide Diesel's designers with the opportunity to experiment with new cuts and fabrics, which may eventually trickle down to the main D-Diesel brand.
Please visit the dedicated case website to access Diesel's television commercials and PowerPoint presentations of all case exhibits and print advertising campaigns.

Pedagogical Objectives:
The case focuses on the selection of the branding strategy for StyleLab: should it be an independent brand with no link to Diesel, a sub-brand of Diesel, or an independent brand endorsed by Diesel? It can also be used to discuss critical issues in the marketing of fashion and luxury brands. In particular, it illustrates how Diesel has managed to grow without losing its core identity. The main objectives of the case are to develop an understanding of the key issues involved in managing a portfolio of brands and to evaluate alternative branding strategies for launching a new brand using a structured approach and tools. The case also illustrates critical issues in the marketing of fashion and luxury brands, most notably brand extensions. This case has been successfully taught in an MBA course on brand management. It can also be used in a session on branding in a marketing management course. The large corpus of Diesel's controversial print and television advertisements also make the case suitable for an advertising course or the advertising module of a marketing management course. Finally, the case can also be used in a market research course to illustrate the value of experimental methods for studying the effects of branding.

Keywords:
Branding, Marketing, Brand Management, Brand Extension, Fashion, Luxury Goods, Advertising

Prizes won:
- 2013 Case Centre Best Selling Case in Marketing
- 2012 ecch Best Selling Case in Marketing
- 2008 ecch Best-selling Case in Marketing
- 2007 ecch Best-selling Case in Marketing
- Overall Winner of 2007 European Case Awards
- 2006 ecch Best-selling Case in Marketing
- Winner of 2006 European Case Awards, Marketing Category
- 2005 ecch Best-selling Cases in Marketing
- 2004 ecch Best-selling Case in Marketing

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published: 07 Mar 2012

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Abstract:
Renova, fabricant portugais de papier toilette, se bat pour survivre dans un marché banalisé et stagnant dominé par les géants mondiaux et les marques de distributeurs. Pour grandir et rester indépendant, le PDG Paulo Pereira da Silva envisage trois options : 1/ la fabrication pour les marques de distributeurs, 2) la recherche d’innovations fonctionnelles, et 3) le lancement d’un papier toilette noir. Que devrait-il faire ? Et comment mettre en oeuvre la stratégie choisie ? N’hésitez pas à visiter le site support du cas Renova. Vous y verrez une vidéo d’introduction et une copie d’inspection du cas.

Pedagogical Objectives:
En explorant les défis auxquels sont confrontés les petits acteurs dans les catégories banalisées stagnantes dominées par les géants mondiaux et les marques de distributeurs, le cas fournit une information détaillée sur le comportement du consommateur, la concurrence et la société (notamment la marque et les anciennes campagnes de communication). Il rend compte du succès des marques de distributeurs et explique quand produire pour une marque de distributeur a du sens. Il illustre le rôle clé du marketing et de la marque, montrant comment Renova s’est différenciée sur des avantages hédoniques et symboliques dans une catégorie que l’on pensait irrémédiablement banalisée.

Keywords:
Marketing, Marque, Marque De Distributeur, Luxe, Bien De Consommation, Blue Ocean, Innovation, Publicité, European Competitiveness, Europe, Best Practices

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published: 01 Apr 2015

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Abstract:
Yue Sai is L’Oreal’s troubled Chinese luxury brand. Alexis Perakis-Valat, the new CEO of L’Oréal China, has made it a point of honor to turn the brand around. He has asked Stéphane Wilmet, the brand’s new general manager, to come up with a turnaround plan that will restore L’Oréal’s reputation in China as the world’s best cosmetic marketer. Stéphane Wilmet and Ronnie Liang, Yue Sai’s marketing director, must reconsider everything from Yue Sai’s value proposition down to its media, price, product, and distribution strategies.
Please visit the dedicated case website to to watch commercials and video interviews.

Pedagogical Objectives:
The case shows the challenges that even very successful multinational firms experience when doing business in China. Specific topics discussed include: 1. Functional vs. emotional branding. Can all brands become “passion” brands? Should they? 2. Effects of country of origin, national pride, traditions and cultural beliefs in today’s China. 3. Marketing “masstige” (affordable luxury) brands. How to leverage brand heritage while staying current and relevant in a fast-moving market.

Keywords:
Marketing, China, Branding, Advertising, Cosmetics, Luxury, Beauty

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published: 05 Jul 2013

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Abstract:
Yue Sai is L’Oreal’s troubled Chinese luxury brand. Alexis Perakis-Valat, the new CEO of L’Oréal China, has made it a point of honor to turn the brand around. He has asked Stéphane Wilmet, the brand’s new general manager, to come up with a turnaround plan that will restore L’Oréal’s reputation in China as the world’s best cosmetic marketer. Stéphane Wilmet and Ronnie Liang, Yue Sai’s marketing director, must reconsider everything from Yue Sai’s value proposition down to its media, price, product, and distribution strategies.
Please visit the dedicated case website to to watch commercials and video interviews.

Pedagogical Objectives:
The case shows the challenges that even very successful multinational firms experience when doing business in China. Specific topics discussed include: 1. Functional vs. emotional branding. Can all brands become “passion” brands? Should they? 2. Effects of country of origin, national pride, traditions and cultural beliefs in today’s China. 3. Marketing “masstige” (affordable luxury) brands. How to leverage brand heritage while staying current and relevant in a fast-moving market.

Keywords:
Marketing, China, Branding, Advertising, Cosmetics, Luxury, Beauty, European Competitiveness, Europe

Prizes won:
- 2016 Best Selling Cases In France
- Overall Winner of 2016 Case Awards, Case Centre
- Best marketing case of 2014 by the CCMP
- 2013 Case Centre Best Selling Case in Marketing

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published: 06 Jan 2003

  • Topic: Marketing
  • Industry: Pharmaceutics
  • Region: Europe

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Abstract:
In July 1996, the French social security governmental agency (the CNAM) sent a letter to all doctors urging them to prescribe generic amoxicillin instead of Clamoxyl, SmithKline Beecham’s (SB) blockbuster antibiotic. Pierre Chahwakilian, Marketing Director of SB in France must decide how to respond: (1) milk Clamoxyl and divert promotional investments towards Augmentin, a more specialized and still patent-protected antibiotic, (2) strengthen Clamoxyl’s brand equity among doctors by increasing the effort of medical reps, by launching new forms, or with new advertising, (3) go against SB’s corporate philosophy and reduce the price of Clamoxyl, or (4) change nothing and count on the resistance of French doctors towards generics. The B case (Augmentin in 2002) shows that GSK (the company formed by the merger of Glaxo Wellcome and SmithKline Beecham) now faces the same options for Augmentin, another blockbuster antibiotic. Should they use the strategy that was so successful for Clamoxyl or have the market conditions changed so much that a whole different approach should be followed?

Pedagogical Objectives:
Discuss possible strategies that brands in general, and branded drugs in particular, can use to fight generic products Provide an introduction to the marketing of pharmaceutical products Discuss the value of branding for professional buyers (expert who prescribe the product as opposed to non-expert who use or consume the product).

Keywords:
Marketing, Branding, Pricing, Brand Management, Pharmaceutical Products, Prescription Drugs, Generic Drugs, Hmi, Pharmaceutical and Medical Device Sectors

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published: 01 Jun 2003

  • Topic: Marketing
  • Industry: Pharmaceutics
  • Region: Europe

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Abstract:
Please refert to part A for the abstract

Keywords:
Hmi, Pharmaceutical and Medical Device Sectors

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