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Case Studies by Andrew Shipilov

11 case studies

by Publication Date
published: 25 Mar 2019

  • Topic: Strategy
  • Region: Europe

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Abstract:
The case illustrates how Atos, a global leader in digital transformation, used a social networking based tool (blueKiwi) to replace email in its internal communications. The key to its successful deployment was the creation of professional communities (analogous to groups in Facebook) around specific issues. While the company was not able to rid itself of email completely, it did achieve increased efficiency in internal information sharing.

Pedagogical Objectives:
The case illustrates key concepts from “The Social Organization: How to Use Social Media to Tap the Collective Genius of your Customers and Employees” by Anthony J. Bradley and Mark P. McDonald. For social-media-based tools to be successfully deployed, firms should: • Define how the community collaboration experience should function, with a clear statement of purpose as a starting point. • Develop a “tipping point” plan, i.e. a strategy to spread awareness; aim for “viral expansion” (voluntary participation rather than top-down) to reach a sustainable community that should be guided and monitored, but not too closely. • Develop a suitable environment in which the community can congregate and collaborate (social media software, appropriate user experience, etc). Case (A) looks at problems associated with email as a communications medium and describes how blueKiwi, a social media type platform, allows people to communicate within communities around specific issues. Case (B) describes the outcomes, including measures used by Atos to evaluate the health of communities. BlueKiwi did allow the company to become more agile and built the foundation for work based on self-organizing teams.

Keywords:
Organizational Change, Social Media, Social Media Communities, Information Technology Company, Consulting, Agility

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published: 25 Mar 2019

  • Topic: Strategy
  • Region: Europe

Show details ...

Abstract:
The case illustrates how Atos, a global leader in digital transformation, used a social networking based tool (blueKiwi) to replace email in its internal communications. The key to its successful deployment was the creation of professional communities (analogous to groups in Facebook) around specific issues. While the company was not able to rid itself of email completely, it did achieve increased efficiency in internal information sharing.

Pedagogical Objectives:
The case illustrates key concepts from “The Social Organization: How to Use Social Media to Tap the Collective Genius of your Customers and Employees” by Anthony J. Bradley and Mark P. McDonald. For social-media-based tools to be successfully deployed, firms should: • Define how the community collaboration experience should function, with a clear statement of purpose as a starting point. • Develop a “tipping point” plan, i.e. a strategy to spread awareness; aim for “viral expansion” (voluntary participation rather than top-down) to reach a sustainable community that should be guided and monitored, but not too closely. • Develop a suitable environment in which the community can congregate and collaborate (social media software, appropriate user experience, etc). Case (A) looks at problems associated with email as a communications medium and describes how blueKiwi, a social media type platform, allows people to communicate within communities around specific issues. Case (B) describes the outcomes, including measures used by Atos to evaluate the health of communities. BlueKiwi did allow the company to become more agile and built the foundation for work based on self-organizing teams.

Keywords:
Organizational Change, Social Media, Social Media Communities, Information Technology Company, Consulting, Agility

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published: 13 Feb 2019

  • Topic: Strategy
  • Region: Global

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Abstract:
The case provides a strategic overview of one of the UK’s fastest-growing household goods companies, Dyson Ltd. Starting out in the early 1990s as sole vendor of bagless vacuum cleaners in the UK market, Dyson would ultimately become the market leader before its competitors finally woke up. The case tracks founder James Dyson’s global ambitions over an 18-year period until his entry into the electric vehicle market, and a move of corporate headquarters to Singapore (2019), with Asia now accounting for the majority of revenues. It offers insights into the multi-faceted vision of the founder, who combines inventiveness and a love of engineering and design with a rigid respect for lawful business practice.

Pedagogical Objectives:
The case offers a broad tableau to deliver courses on a wide range of topics, strategy and management, family business, supply chains, entrepreneurship and international business. With an easy-to-read style to facilitate classroom discussion (Masters in Management, MBA and executive education), supporting materials include video clips of interviews with the first CEO of Dyson France.

Keywords:
Dyson, Bagless, Vacuum Cleaner, Electric Vehicle, Hoover, Singapore, Patent Infringement, Innovation, Inventor, Engineering, Digital Motors, Batteries, Hand Dryer, Purifier

published: 26 Feb 2018

  • Topic: Strategy
  • Industry: Financial services
  • Region: Global

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Abstract:
The case discusses different steps which Mastercard has followed in its digital transformation journey. They involve opportunity framing, creating innovation pathways, finding digital transformation opportunities, and innovation with partners within adaptive ecosystems. With the objective to stop competing with other payment processing firms (like Visa or Amex) and start competing with cash, Mastercard has moved from an undifferentiated processor of payments to a builder of unique technological platforms.

Pedagogical Objectives:
- Illustrate a four-step digital transformation journey
- Demonstrate how companies can build innovation pathways for digital transformation and beyond
- Provide examples of successful ecosystem building strategies in for-profit and non-for-profit sectors

Keywords:
Strategy, Digital Trasformation, Fintech, Ecosystems, Platforms, Innovation, Innovation Labs, Innovation Processes, Partnerships

published: 29 Mar 2017

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Abstract:
This case illustrates the key role played by a local distributor in the luxury goods industry in the Middle East. By partnering with the Chalhoub Group, western firms have built a competitive advantage across the six countries of the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC). While not typical of western luxury brands selling to global markets other than the Middle East, their alliances with the Chalhoub Group offer access to a vast network of 650 stores in prime locations in the GCC, many in new shopping malls. Chalhoub has retail outlets in 14 countries in the MENA region. Since its establishment in 1955, the Dubai-based Chalhoub has developed partnerships with Christian Dior, Sephora, Louis Vuitton, Fendi and many others. In so doing it has laid the foundations for the creation of own-concept stores, where it sells its own branded products.

Pedagogical Objectives:
This case can be taught in executive education and elective MBA courses in luxury management. The focus is on the marketing and distribution of personal luxury goods in the Middle East, a region that outperformed the global luxury market until the collapse of oil prices in 2014. The case examines consumer characteristics in the Middle East, the unique business model of the Chalhoub organization, which employs over 12,000 people in the region – including Saudi Arabia where women play a surprisingly big role in its workforce – and its investment in employee training to a degree rarely seen among retail distributors in the West.

Keywords:
Chalhoub, Beauty, Fashion, Ghawali, Level Kids, Katakeet, Wajooh, Level Shoes, Tanagra, Gcc, Wassim Eid, Fadi Jabbour, Tdesign

published: 24 Feb 2014

  • Topic: Strategy
  • Region: Global

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Abstract:
This case explores the career development of professionals with strong leadership potential within an international business group - LVMH. It follows the career progression of an MBA graduate, her exposure to networks and mentors, and her international mobility.

Pedagogical Objectives:
To understand that each industry has its codes - specific formal and informal rules, tacit and explicit knowledge - which must be mastered. The culture of LVMH is also specific, with a focus on harnessing passion, agility, excellence, etc.

Keywords:
Leadership, Luxury Industry, Networks, Mobility, European Competitiveness Initiative, European Competitiveness, Europe, Best Practices

published: 24 Feb 2014

  • Topic: Strategy
  • Region: Global

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Abstract:
This case shows 1) the strategic importance of talent management 2) the best practice of LVMH in this regard. It illustrates how LVMH extracts synergies across maisons (“houses”).

Pedagogical Objectives:
The case can be used to illustrate the concepts of "industry analysis" and "competitive advantage" especially as applied to analyzing drivers of differentiation strategy. It can be used as a part of core strategy sequence in MBA or EMBA programmes as well as in Executive Education.The key teaching point is that when well-managed, employee mobility within a business group is valuable for the internal benefits it provides (e.g., the transfer of best practices across the group) and its external positive effects (e.g., attracting the right talent). It thus gives firms a competitive advantage when pursuing a differentiation strategy in the luxury industry.

Keywords:
Strategic Talent Management, Luxury Industry, Networks, Business Groups, European Competitiveness Initiative, European Competitiveness, Europe, Best Practices

published: 24 May 2012

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Abstract:
The head of Tupperware Nordic faces high turnover and low motivation of the sales consultants. He seeks to understand how to use social media in innovative ways to address these challenges and to modernize the image of Tupperware. Instead of making significant investments in IT infrastructure, he uses existing social media tools and focuses on building emotional capital inside Tupperware.

Pedagogical Objectives:
The case can be used to do an industry analysis and conduct an assessment of the drivers of the company's competitive advantage. It shows how the use of the new communication technologies (such as social media) inside and outside the organization must be linked to understanding the sources of competitive advantage. The case can be used to develop the concept of an organization's.

Keywords:
Social Media, Competitive Advantage, Direct Selling, Social Networking, Emotional Capital, Knowledge Sharing, European Competitiveness, Europe, Best Practices

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published: 24 May 2012

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Abstract:
The head of Tupperware Nordic faces high turnover and low motivation of the sales consultants. He seeks to understand how to use social media in innovative ways to address these challenges and to modernize the image of Tupperware. Instead of making significant investments in IT infrastructure, he uses existing social media tools and focuses on building emotional capital inside Tupperware.

Pedagogical Objectives:
The case can be used to do an industry analysis and conduct an assessment of the drivers of the company's competitive advantage. It shows how the use of the new communication technologies (such as social media) inside and outside the organization must be linked to understanding the sources of competitive advantage. The case can be used to develop the concept of an organization's.

Keywords:
Social Media, Competitive Advantage, Direct Selling, Social Networking, Emotional Capital, Knowledge Sharing, European Competitiveness, Europe, Best Practices

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published: 09 Jan 2006

  • Topic: Strategy
  • Region: Global

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Abstract:
The objective of this note is to help students understand the criteria according to which they can identify value innovations, that is, products or services suitable for implementation of a Blue Ocean Strategy. Not every innovation will represent a value innovation. A company can introduce a new technology or be the first to enter a market with a new offering, but neither of these constitutes a value innovation. The sequence of diagnostic steps contained in this note can help students identify whether a particular offering represents a value innovation, using the example of McDonald's Restaurants.

Pedagogical Objectives:
This case note lists the sequence of heuristic steps that the students have to follow in order to determine whether a particular offering represents a value innovation, that is, products or services suitable for implementation of a Blue Ocean Strategy. It can be used both in MBA and Executive program teaching.

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