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Case Studies by Anne Yang

16 case studies

by Publication Date
published: 29 Oct 2018

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Abstract:
When Alibaba, China’s leading digital platform and cloud-based services company, fails to acquire the US firm Moneygram, CEO Jack Ma decides to go it alone and develop a digital strategy using blockchain technology as the basis for a global remittance service, GCash, within its cloud services business. Alibaba’s financial services affiliate Ant Financial, begins by targeting cross-border money transfers made by domestic workers in Hong Kong who routinely send money to their families in the Philippines. It subsequently forms a strategic alliance with Globe Telecom and Standard Chartered Bank which provide market access and financial intermediation. The case focuses on the value proposition of blockchain in cross-border financial services, particularly in Southeast Asia, and how it fits into Alibaba's "iron triangle" cloud services strategy in the region where there is fierce competition from Google and Digital Ocean. Blockchain technology is utilized to disintermediate the US-based SWIFT system and the dominant remittance service providers, Moneygram and Western Union, that charge high fees. As an illustration of how to launch proprietary cypto- and blockchain-based networks, the case explains how they differ from digital platforms, and how they are complementary, such as network effects and synergies with Alibaba’s installed customer base.
Please visit the dedicated case website to access supplementary material.

Pedagogical Objectives:
The case study incorporates important lessons in digital entrepreneurship, digital strategy, blockchain, cloud and web services, fintech, network effects, and diversification across technology platforms.

Keywords:
Digital Entrepreneurship, Blockchain, Cloud, Cloud Service, Fintech, Remittances, Network Effects, Crypto, Alibaba, Web Services, Fintech, Southeast Asia, China, Hong Kong, Philippines, Digital Strategy, Digital Platform, Platforms

published: 31 Aug 2018

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Abstract:
Grab, Uber and Go-Jek compete in ride-hailing and related logistics and transport services (e.g., food delivery, courier service) across Southeast Asia, including Indonesia, Philippines, Vietnam, Thailand, Malaysia and Singapore. The case focuses on differences in company history and strategy, and how they influence shape the competition and ultimately performance differentials. The goal is to illustrate the dynamics of platform-based competition across a region. Issues covered include network effects, achieving scale, one-country focus versus expansion in an interconnected region, technological standardization versus localization, mutual forbearance and real options across product features and market geographies, and how equity ownership and control drive consolidation in platform ecosystems.

Pedagogical Objectives:
The case offers lessons in digital entrepreneurship, platform competition, network effects, internationalization strategy, technology standards, mutual forbearance, real options, market consolidation, and equity ownership and control.

Keywords:
Digital Entrepreneurship, Platforms, Competition, Network Effects, Mutual Forebearance, Real Options, Ride-Sharing, Ride-Hailing, Two-Sided Market, Southeast Asia, Indonesia, Singapore, Malaysia, Uber, Grab, Go-Jek

published: 28 May 2018

  • Topic: Family Business
  • Region: North America

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Abstract:
This is not your typical family business case and that is what makes it such a rich teaching tool and learning experience. The Paul Newman story covers several family business topics and issues including Fair Process, philanthropy, social ventures, estate and succession planning, governance, next generation roles, entrepreneurship, family communication and relationships, and non-family executives. The sense of fairness is achieved with effective family communication and governance that builds trust to support long-term family commitment. The Newman case demonstrates the difficulty of making ownership, governance and leadership decisions that are effective and perceived as fair by the next generation.

Pedagogical Objectives:
Fair Process is at the core of INSEAD’s work with business families. The sense of fairness is achieved with effective family and business communication and governance that builds trust and supports long-term family commitment. The Newman case deals with the difficulty of making leadership and ownership decisions that are perceived as fair by a business family.

Keywords:
Fair Process, Social Ventures, Planning, Next Generation Leadership, Communication, Non-Family Executives, Estate Planning, Difficult Conversations, Entrepreneurship, Next Generation Commitment, Family Relationships, Next Generation Careers

published: 23 Apr 2018

  • Topic: Entrepreneurship
  • Industry: Digital Platform, Mobile Application, Logistics, Ride-Sharing, Food Delivery
  • Region: Asia
  • Website: https://cases.insead.edu/go-jek

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Abstract:
Read a related Knowledge article "Digital Lessons from Go-Jek, Indonesia’s Answer to Uber and Grab" by Jason Davis.

Go-Jek, a ride-sharing, food-delivery and logistics company, was the first ‘unicorn’ startup (private company valued over $1 billion) to be founded in Indonesia. Case (A) focuses on the launch of Go-Jek as a mobile ride-sharing and food delivery platform, the network effects, and the digital disruption of existing taxi drivers. Case (B) describes the competition with digital entrants Uber and Grab and with incumbent taxi companies, and its use of funds from Sequoia, Rakuten, KKR, Temasek, Tencent, and Google to compete. Case (C) explores Go-Jek’s product experimentation in financial services with the Go-Pay wallet, potential international expansion and the ultimate goal to achieve 'super app' status (like Alipay and Wechat in China) in Southeast Asia.
Please visit the dedicated case website to access supplementary material.

Pedagogical Objectives:
This case series offers lessons in digital entrepreneurship, launching platforms, network effects, platform competition, product experimentation, internationalization by start-ups, and diversification to become a 'super app'.

Keywords:
Digital Entrepreneurship, Platforms, Network Effects, Experimentation, Ride-Sharing, Transportation and Logistics, Lean Startup, Two-Sided Market, Indonesia, Southeast Asia, Singapore

Related:

published: 23 Apr 2018

  • Topic: Entrepreneurship
  • Industry: Digital Platform, Mobile Application, Logistics, Ride-Sharing, Food Delivery
  • Region: Asia
  • Website: https://cases.insead.edu/go-jek

Show details ...

Abstract:
Read a related Knowledge article "Digital Lessons from Go-Jek, Indonesia’s Answer to Uber and Grab" by Jason Davis.

Go-Jek, a ride-sharing, food-delivery and logistics company, was the first ‘unicorn’ startup (private company valued over $1 billion) to be founded in Indonesia. Case (A) focuses on the launch of Go-Jek as a mobile ride-sharing and food delivery platform, the network effects, and the digital disruption of existing taxi drivers. Case (B) describes the competition with digital entrants Uber and Grab and with incumbent taxi companies, and its use of funds from Sequoia, Rakuten, KKR, Temasek, Tencent, and Google to compete. Case (C) explores Go-Jek’s product experimentation in financial services with the Go-Pay wallet, potential international expansion and the ultimate goal to achieve 'super app' status (like Alipay and Wechat in China) in Southeast Asia.
Please visit the dedicated case website to access supplementary material.

Pedagogical Objectives:
This case series offers lessons in digital entrepreneurship, launching platforms, network effects, platform competition, product experimentation, internationalization by start-ups, and diversification to become a 'super app'.

Keywords:
Digital Entrepreneurship, Platforms, Network Effects, Experimentation, Ride-Sharing, Transportation and Logistics, Lean Startup, Two-Sided Market, Indonesia, Southeast Asia, Singapore

Related:

published: 23 Apr 2018

  • Topic: Entrepreneurship
  • Industry: Digital Platform, Mobile Application, Logistics, Ride-Sharing, Food Delivery
  • Region: Asia
  • Website: https://cases.insead.edu/go-jek

Show details ...

Abstract:
Read a related Knowledge article "Digital Lessons from Go-Jek, Indonesia’s Answer to Uber and Grab" by Jason Davis.

Go-Jek, a ride-sharing, food-delivery and logistics company, was the first ‘unicorn’ startup (private company valued over $1 billion) to be founded in Indonesia. Case (A) focuses on the launch of Go-Jek as a mobile ride-sharing and food delivery platform, the network effects, and the digital disruption of existing taxi drivers. Case (B) describes the competition with digital entrants Uber and Grab and with incumbent taxi companies, and its use of funds from Sequoia, Rakuten, KKR, Temasek, Tencent, and Google to compete. Case (C) explores Go-Jek’s product experimentation in financial services with the Go-Pay wallet, potential international expansion and the ultimate goal to achieve 'super app' status (like Alipay and Wechat in China) in Southeast Asia.
Please visit the dedicated case website to access supplementary material.

Pedagogical Objectives:
This case series offers lessons in digital entrepreneurship, launching platforms, network effects, platform competition, product experimentation, internationalization by start-ups, and diversification to become a 'super app'.

Keywords:
Digital Entrepreneurship, Platforms, Network Effects, Experimentation, Ride-Sharing, Transportation and Logistics, Lean Startup, Two-Sided Market, Indonesia, Southeast Asia, Singapore

Related:

published: 27 Feb 2017

  • Topic: Economics & Finance
  • Industry: Education, paper, research
  • Region: Global

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Abstract:
The case focuses on the main issues faced by two US-listed Chinese companies – Orient Paper (NYSE MKT: ONP) and New Oriental Education and Technology Group (NYSE: EDU) – when they were attacked by Muddy Waters, LLC. Interestingly, the seemingly similar responses of the two “Orientals” resulted in widely disparate outcomes, offering lessons to emerging market firms eager to embrace the global capital markets. The case aims to help students understand the mechanism of short selling in the context of “bear” attacks, and expose the problems that attract short sellers’ attention, as well as the actions companies can take to deal with them. It also explains the normative role that short selling plays in the market: to discipline corporate behaviour and improve market efficiency.

Pedagogical Objectives:
The case is suited for any (or all) of the following purposes: 1. To introduce the process of short selling and the parties involved. 2. To identify the common problems that tend to attract “bear” attacks, from the experience of the two Orientals and other examples. Four categories are described in detail. 3. To explore actions that companies can take in dealing with short selling. A bear attack is not necessarily bad for a company; a plunge in the stock price in the short term creates an opportunity for good companies (as well as top management) to legally buy back shares at a lower price. 4. To understand the normative implications of short selling as part of ‘the invisible hand of the market’ to discipline corporate incentives.

Keywords:
Short Selling, ‘bear’ Attacks, Overseas Listing, Global Capital Market, Chinese Companies Overseas Ipo, Corporate Transparency, Invisible Hand, Market Efficiency, Responses to Short Selling, Countering ‘bear’ Attacks

published: 29 Sep 2014

  • Topic: Economics & Finance
  • Industry: Various
  • Region: Global

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Abstract:
One of the biggest challenges for multinational corporations (MNCs) is to determine and consolidate their borders. In order to do so, MNCs increasingly strive to create value innovation, particularly within their internal capital market. Accordingly, their corporate treasury functions have witnessed three stages of major evolution in the 21st century.

Pedagogical Objectives:
This case aims to provide an in-depth analysis of MNCs' treasury evolution based on Blue Ocean Strategy and the Coase theorem. In particular, we discuss how corporate treasury can help MNCs to consolidate their borders and how its different stages of evolution can result in either value creation or value innovation.

Keywords:
Blue Ocean, Corporate Treasury, Coase Theorem, Globalization, In-House Bank, Re-Invoicing, Internal Capital Market, Shadow Banking

published: 23 Jun 2014

  • Topic: Economics & Finance
  • Region: Asia

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Abstract:
China represents a significant share of global foreign direct investment but its currency comprises a mere 1.5% of all global foreign exchange transactions. This case describes the measures introduced by the Chinese government to promote the use of the renminbi (RMB) in cross-border trade, financing and other internationalization initiatives, as well as the associated challenges.

Pedagogical Objectives:
The case introduces and discusses: 1. Countries and currencies 2. China’s economic development and emergence on the global stage 3. Process and policies for the renminbi's internationalization 4. Key stakeholders and implications 5. Potential problems and challenges 6. 3 case scenarios involving the RMB

Keywords:
Renminbi, Currency, Treasury Globalization, Internationalization, Globalization, Monetary Policies, Economic Development, Cross-Border Finance, Corporate Governance, Corporate Governance for Family Firms

published: 27 Aug 2012

  • Topic: Operations
  • Industry: Logistics
  • Region: Asia

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Abstract:
In 2008, DHL Express Asia Pacific started to assess its carbon footprint from energy consumption in real estate and ground transport in order to measure and improve carbon efficiency through carbon abatement programmes. The case describes how DHL Express AP’s GoGreen initiatives succeeded in improving its carbon footprint and its overall CO2 efficiency by 19% in 2009, while dramatically reducing its operating costs despite higher power rates and the opening of numerous new sites across Asia Pacific.

Pedagogical Objectives:
The main objective of the case is to explore how by focusing on reducing its carbon footprint, a company can at the same time become more efficient in its core business. The case also illustrates the implementation of a goGreen initiative in an oil-intensive industry.

Keywords:
Carbon Accounting, Sustainability, Supply Chain Management

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