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Case Studies by Chan W. Kim and
Renee Mauborgne

70 case studies

by Publication Date
published: 28 Aug 2019

  • Topic: Strategy
  • Region: Asia

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Abstract:
The background notes accompany the free online case “Indian Premier League: Innovation Without Disruption”, a self-paced, interactive case that lets readers analyze the strategic logic behind the launch of Indian Premier League (IPL) using blue ocean analytical tools and frameworks. With visual aids and interactive exercises, the case explores how the IPL transformed traditional days-long cricket matches into a thrilling three-hour sports drama with Bollywood music and cheerleaders, and opened up a new market space - “cricketainment” on the pitch and on primetime TV for families to enjoy. Students and executives come to understand the IPL and cricketainment market as an example of nondisruptive creation, i.e., they did not displace or disrupt the existing sector (players, products or services). They were creative but not destructive of what went before, i.e., the domestic cricket league and other forms of entertainment. Applying Chan Kim and Renée Mauborgne’s three-step process, readers discover how the IPL unlocked a new market that was beneficial to both the domestic cricket league and the entertainment industry. The interactive online case and companion teaching materials can be obtained from https://www.blueoceanstrategy.com/teaching-materials/IPL

Pedagogical Objectives:
The teaching objectives of the online case and background notes are: 1) To explore how the Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI) reinvented the way cricket was played and enjoyed; 2) Apply Blue Ocean concepts, tools and frameworks to the BCCI’s strategic move to create the IPL; 3) Understand that innovation and growth can be driven by “nondisruptive creation”; 4) Illustrate that concept/process using the BCCI’s success in creating a new market and exponential growth without displacing or disrupting the existing order.

Keywords:
Blue Ocean Strategy, Blue Ocean Shift, Indian Premier League, Value Innovation, Sport, Cricket, India, Bollywood, Ipl, Nondisruptive Creation, Sports Business, Public Private Partnership, Disruption, Entertainment

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Abstract:
The Universidad Privada Boliviana (UPB), the Private University of Bolivia, was founded in 1993. Not long after, in the late 1990s, civil unrest erupted with coca growers battling police in the streets outside the campus. Students and faculty fled, the prior President retired, and UPB was functionally insolvent. Manuel Olave was hired as Rector (President) in 1999 to salvage the struggling school. Charged with turning around the struggling university, Olave realized that head-on competition would not help UPB thrive. Instead of benchmarking against leading universities, Olave formed a team to explore growth opportunities, using blue ocean methodologies like the Buyer Utility Map, Strategy Canvas, and ERRC Grid. Based on insights from the blue ocean shift process, UPB made a series of strategic moves to capture untapped demand for higher education that was more affordable and of higher value for students. Two decades later, UPB is ranked the best private university in Bolivia, enrollment is at capacity, and the school is planning a third campus.

Pedagogical Objectives:
• To explore a real world example of how a struggling education institution can turn around based on the blue ocean shift process. • To learn how a noncustomer analysis can help an organization uncover hidden pain points and create new demand. • To understand how a blue ocean leader can galvanize support and build confidence through the blue ocean shift process.

Keywords:
Education, University, Business School, Blue Ocean Strategy, Blue Ocean Shift, Value Innovation, Turnaround, Bolivia, Universidad Privada Boliviana, Upb Bolivia, Evo Morales, Santa Cruz De La Sierra, Latin America, Non Profit

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Abstract:
The Universidad Privada Boliviana (UPB), the Private University of Bolivia, was founded in 1993. Not long after, in the late 1990s, civil unrest erupted with coca growers battling police in the streets outside the campus. Students and faculty fled, the prior President retired, and UPB was functionally insolvent. Manuel Olave was hired as Rector (President) in 1999 to salvage the struggling school. Charged with turning around the struggling university, Olave realized that head-on competition would not help UPB thrive. Instead of benchmarking against leading universities, Olave formed a team to explore growth opportunities, using blue ocean methodologies like the Buyer Utility Map, Strategy Canvas, and ERRC Grid. Based on insights from the blue ocean shift process, UPB made a series of strategic moves to capture untapped demand for higher education that was more affordable and of higher value for students. Two decades later, UPB is ranked the best private university in Bolivia, enrollment is at capacity, and the school is planning a third campus.

Pedagogical Objectives:
• To explore a real world example of how a struggling education institution can turn around based on the blue ocean shift process. • To learn how a noncustomer analysis can help an organization uncover hidden pain points and create new demand. • To understand how a blue ocean leader can galvanize support and build confidence through the blue ocean shift process.

Keywords:
Education, University, Business School, Blue Ocean Strategy, Blue Ocean Shift, Value Innovation, Turnaround, Bolivia, Universidad Privada Boliviana, Upb Bolivia, Evo Morales, Santa Cruz De La Sierra, Latin America, Non Profit

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published: 02 May 2019

  • Topic: Strategy
  • Region: Asia

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Abstract:
Nintendo languished in last place during the console wars of the early 2000s, with game industry analysts suggesting that the Kyoto-based firm exit the gaming console market altogether. Instead, Nintendo used Blue Ocean Strategy to redefine market boundaries, creating the best-selling videogame console ever, the Nintendo Wii. Targeting noncustomers, the Wii outsold Sony’s PlayStation and Microsoft’s Xbox combined, until the market was disrupted by smartphones and tablets. Mobile technology targeted the same noncustomers, offering easy-to-understand games and controls, and Wii sales suffered. Nintendo initially responded by introducing a tablet-like console, the Wii U, a poor copy of the tablet experience that was a dismal failure. Stepping back, Nintendo again used Blue Ocean Strategy to “value innovate” with the Nintendo Switch, the only console to outpace the Wii in sales, and by moving into adjacent markets, working with businesses in which it held a minority stake to release the wildly popular Pokémon Go and other mobile games.

Pedagogical Objectives:
• Explore how strategy can be used to shape industry structure and market space, and the importance of linking technology to value. • Understand that businesses go through ups and downs, and that in an up-phase continually value innovating is as important as in a down-phase. • The importance of long-term growth, balancing and planning a product portfolio for the right balance between earnings and growth. This case uses Chan Kim & Renée Mauborgne’s Pioneer-Migrator-Settler Map to map Nintendo’s product portfolio over time and explain its performance.

Keywords:
Nintendo, Wii, Nintendo Switch, Pokémon Go, Mobile Games, Playstation, Xbox, Market Creating Strategy, Videogame Consoles, Blue Ocean Strategy, Blue Ocean Shift, Augmented Reality, Value Innovation, Disruption

published: 22 Mar 2019

  • Topic: Strategy
  • Region: North America

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Abstract:
Customers are gaga for Wawa, the restaurant / convienence store / gas station that inspires people to tattoo the firm’s logo. Founded in 1803, the company morphed over time from an iron foundry to a textile mill, to a dairy farm, dairy delivery business, grocery store, then convienence store. Dark clouds descended with the 2008 financial crisis. As competitiors converged on Wawa, management recognized the need for a new direction. After the CEO asked his executives to review a selection of business books, they chose Blue Ocean Strategy to redefine industry boundaries, shifting away from the red ocean of competition to a blue ocean of differentiation and low cost. By 2017 Wawa was the 34th largest private company in the US, with 625 million customers and sales of $10.5 billion. It serves 222 million cups of coffee a year and 105 million hoagie sandwiches. Where the average 7-Eleven convienence store grosses $30,000-$35,000 per week, Wawa averages $116,000. It used Blue Ocean Shift to achieve breakout success and thrive for a decade after its strategic pivot.

Pedagogical Objectives:
• Blue Ocean businesses can be created and thrive in markets thought to be hopelessly red ocean, including retail, gas stations and restaurants. • The methodical use of the Blue Ocean process and tools provides structure to break out of the red ocean and are more effective than an ad hoc approach. • When a company creates a Blue Ocean and effectively aligns its value, profit and people propositions, it typically takes years for credible challengers to emerge. Since its Blue Ocean shift, Wawa has enjoyed a decade of strong profitable growth, rolling out its new offering across its 800 stores. • All Blue Oceans eventually turn red. In the long term, success requires reaching for new Blue Oceans as existing ones are eventually invaded by challengers.

Keywords:
Retail, Gas Station, Convenience Store, Grocery Store, Restaurant, Quick Serve Restaurant, Fast Casual Restaurant, Wawa, Blue Ocean Strategy, Blue Ocean Shift, Mcdonald’s, Panera, Chipotle

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published: 22 Mar 2019

  • Topic: Strategy
  • Region: Asia

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Abstract:
This highly popular exercise allows participants to actually apply the concept, frameworks, and process of blue ocean shift to one of the most competitive industries – the travel industry. Using worksheets, participants will take a step-by-step approach to systematically shift their strategic logic from competing to creating and apply the processes and tools of blue ocean shift to the travel industry. The case includes a real-life example of a successful blue ocean shift in the travel industry and is accompanied by a firsthand video interview with Dong Gun Lee, CEO of My Real Trip, a Korean company that challenged the travel industry’s long existing assumptions to open new market space.

Pedagogical Objectives:
The case consists of three parts: 1) Part A is a short case that looks into the competitive landscape of the travel industry in Korea and ends with the challenging question to participants to create their own blue ocean strategy. 2) A Blue Ocean Shift Exercise is conducted in the classroom using accompanying worksheets. Participants follow the process of blue ocean shift using the Buyer Utility Map, Noncustomer Analysis, the Six-Path Framework, the E-R-R-C Grid, and the To-Be Strategy Canvas to create their own blue ocean strategy. 3) Part B provides an example of creating a new market space in the travel industry in 2012 in Korea - My Real Trip. This theory-based video case narrates how My Real Trip reconstructed the market boundaries and created new demand in the crowded and divided travel industry. The strategic move can be discussed in the classroom using the lecture slides that accompany this case.

Keywords:
Blue Ocean Strategy, Blue Ocean Shift, Sharing Economy, Travel Industry, Korea, Entrepreneurship, Start-Up, Strategy Formulation, Workshop, Market Creation, Exercise, Innovation

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Abstract:
This case analyses Tata Motors’ strategic move to create and launch the Tata Nano, exploring the factors behind the project’s earlier success and the reasons for its execution failure. It illustrates the importance of having a strong and aligned set of value, profit and people propositions in order to create and capture a blue ocean. The teaching note reviews how Tata Nano created its exceptional value proposition and attained a viable profit proposition by following the right strategic sequence, and then examines different components of Tata Nano’s people proposition to identify the major causes of the setback in executing its blue ocean strategy.

Pedagogical Objectives:
1) To demonstrate how Tata Nano reconstructed market boundaries across alternative industries and created a commercially viable blue ocean opportunity by following the right strategic sequence. 2) To highlight the importance of matching value and profit propositions with an equally strong people proposition in ensuring the successful execution of a blue ocean strategy. 3) To review major BOS concepts, frameworks and tools in the course of analyzing the Tata Nano strategic move.

Keywords:
Tata Nano, Blue Ocean Strategy, Emerging Economy, Strategic Alignment, Automobile Industry, Value Innovation, Strategic Pricing, Target Costing, Strategy Execution, Execution Failure, Stakeholders, Noncustomers

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Abstract:
The Universidad Privada Boliviana (UPB), the Private University of Bolivia, was founded in 1993. Not long after, in the late 1990s, civil unrest erupted with coca growers battling police in the streets outside the campus. Students and faculty fled, the prior President retired, and UPB was functionally insolvent. Manuel Olave was hired as Rector (President) in 1999 to salvage the struggling school. Charged with turning around the struggling university, Olave realized that head-on competition would not help UPB thrive. Instead of benchmarking against leading universities, Olave formed a team to explore growth opportunities, using blue ocean methodologies like the Buyer Utility Map, Strategy Canvas, and ERRC Grid. Based on insights from the blue ocean shift process, UPB made a series of strategic moves to capture untapped demand for higher education that was more affordable and of higher value for students. Two decades later, UPB is ranked the best private university in Bolivia, enrollment is at capacity, and the school is planning a third campus.

Pedagogical Objectives:
• To explore a real world example of how a struggling education institution can turn around based on the blue ocean shift process. • To learn how a noncustomer analysis can help an organization uncover hidden pain points and create new demand. • To understand how a blue ocean leader can galvanize support and build confidence through the blue ocean shift process.

Keywords:
Education, University, Business School, Blue Ocean Strategy, Blue Ocean Shift, Value Innovation, Turnaround, Bolivia, Universidad Privada Boliviana, Upb Bolivia, Evo Morales, Santa Cruz De La Sierra, Latin America, Non Profit

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published: 30 Nov 2018

  • Topic: Strategy
  • Region: Europe

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Abstract:
Charity fundraising in the UK was a deep red ocean when Comic Relief started. Costs were up and donations were down. To stand out from the crowd, organizations had to work harder at fundraising and marketing. Yet Comic Relief rapidly achieved 96 percent national brand awareness and has now raised over £1 billion without spending anything on marketing. Its flagship event, held once every two years, is almost a national holiday in the UK. The case reveals how Comic Relief redefined the problem of the charity-giving industry - from how to get the wealthy to give out of guilt, to how to get everyone ‘to do something funny for money’ – thus reconstructing the market boundaries. It understood how to create new demand by looking to nondonors and what turned them off (the blocks to giving). In so doing, it erected formidable barriers to imitation – cognitive, organisational, economic and legal. Its enduring success relies on the alignment of its value, profit and people propositions. It can be used to teach the following Blue Ocean concepts: (1) the Buyer Utility Map; (2) the Three Tiers of Noncustomers; (3) Barriers to Imitation; and (4) Disruptive versus nondisruptive creation.

Pedagogical Objectives:
• The central importance of noncustomers as a way to gain insights into how to create new demand and generate new growth. Instead of fighting for a greater percentage of existing donors, Comic Relief looked to noncustomers and what turned them off charitable giving, uncovering the major pain points imposed by the industry. This gave critical insight into how to open up new market space - a blue ocean of noncustomers • Barriers to imitation Barriers to imitation effectively prolong the sustainability of a blue ocean strategy, in this case the alignment of value, profit and people propositions, and cognitive, organizational, brand, economic and legal barriers – keeping challengers for many years. • Market creating-strategies are not synonymous with disruptive creation. Rather than replacing an earlier technology or existing product or service, Blue Ocean Shift | Strategy goes beyond disruption to embrace what Chan Kim and Renée Mauborgne call “nondisruptive creation” of a new market and with it new growth. While Comic Relief triggered a measure of disruption, it principally unlocked nondisruptive creation, where its gain didn’t come at the expense of others.

Keywords:
Social Services, Blue Ocean Strategy, Nonprofit Organization, Disruptive Creation, Nondisruptive Creation, Barriers to Imitation, Noncustomers, Market Creating Strategy, Charity, Blue Ocean Shift, Charity Fundraising

published: 29 Oct 2018

  • Topic: Strategy
  • Region: Asia

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Abstract:
The case reviews how the Japanese company Park24 reinvented the short-stay parking industry in Japan and expanded it over the years, establishing itself as the unchallenged market leader. Hitherto short-stay parking in Japan was largely provided as a public service. Shortage of land and the high price of real estate explained the severe shortage of city parking space was due to land scarcity and lofty prices of land resources. Park24 saw that the solution was not building gigantic multi-storey car parks but making parking lots available everywhere people went and accessible anytime of the day. Drawing insights from the convenience store industry, Park24 looked for small plots near popular destinations and launched a low-cost, secure and automated parking service called Times. Rolled out rapidly across Japan, it fundamentally redrew the landscape of the short-stay parking industry. Park24’s blue ocean move shows how a nondisruptive market-creating approach can open up new value-cost frontiers, new demand and high growth.

Pedagogical Objectives:
The teaching of this case aims to investigate and discuss how Park24: 1) Gained insight into creating a blue ocean from non-customers of the existing short-stay parking industry and analyzing their pain points. 2) Redrew the landscape of short-stay carparks in Japan by borrowing key elements from the convenience store industry. 3) Redefined the industry problem (parking) and provided a new solution, opening up a huge new market via non-disruptive creation.

Keywords:
Parking Industry, Short-Stay Parking, Unattractive Industry, New Market Space, Market Creation, Blue Ocean Strategy, Blue Ocean Shift, Noncustomers, Demand Creation, Market Reconstruction, Nondisruptive Creation, . Car Sharing, Digital Data, Differential Pricing

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