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Case Studies by Orla Stapleton

5 case studies

by Publication Date
published: 29 Mar 2012

  • Topic: Operations
  • Industry: Humanitarian sector
  • Region: Global

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Abstract:
Managing projects in decentralised organisations is challenging. IHO is a medium-sized international humanitarian organisation. To improve fleet management in IHO, the goal is to implement vehicle tracking technology. A successful pilot project is followed by a failed rollout. The case examines the managerial and organisational issues affecting the project’s performance.

Pedagogical Objectives:
1. Examine the challenges of project management in a decentralised (humanitarian) organisation operating in an atypical (developing world) context. 2. Highlight the managerial issues affecting a project rollout involving two parties (the logistics function and relief and development programmes in the field) with diverging objectives. 3. Provide a basis for discussion on the transfer of best (management) practices between the humanitarian and private sectors.

Keywords:
Project Management with Uncertainty, Decentralised Decision-Making, Humanitarian Logistics, Fleet Management, Operations in Emerging Economies, Performance Measurement

published: 30 Sep 2009

  • Topic: Operations
  • Industry: Automobile
  • Region: Global

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Abstract:
Denmark-based Kjaer Group had supplied vehicles and services to humanitarian fleets since 1977. In 2005, in an effort to differentiate their value proposition from that of other suppliers to the sector, they devised an integral fleet management solution, thereby moving from a product to a service based offering (servicising) for their customers. This case looks at the key issues involved in making such a transition in an atypical context. Challenges for Kjaer Group included: pinpointing humanitarian organisations’ real needs, identifying who within the client organisations had decision-making authority to implement the solution, and overcoming the traditional suspicion felt by humanitarians towards the private sector.

Pedagogical Objectives:
a) To demonstrate how servicising can be a valuable option for a firm faced with saturation of their core market (Sawhney, Balasubramanian, Krishnan, 2004) b) To highlight the difficulties involved in accurately assessing the needs of the humanitarian sector c) To explore the main customer-related challenges as the firm makes the transition from a product to a service based offering d) To examine the challenges in securing the uptake of a new concept (servicising) by a known but unfamiliar sector.

Keywords:
Servicising, Fleet Management, Humanitarian Operations, Humanitarian/private Sector Collaboration, Decision Making

published: 30 Sep 2009

  • Topic: Operations
  • Industry: Public sector, NGO, International Organizations
  • Region: South America

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Abstract:
This case describes the relief supply chain in the initial 72 hours following a large-scale natural disaster. Taking the earthquake in Armenia as an example, we use the Fritz Institute Framework, published in 2005, to draw a parallel between two response systems: the Colombian government response and the National Society of the Red Cross, part of the Red Cross Movement based in Geneva.

Pedagogical Objectives:
The main objective of this case is to show the complexity of relief operations during the response to large-scale disasters using a supply chain approach. It also shows the effect of problems with coordination and information dissemination on relief operations during the first week of response after the quake.

Keywords:
Humanitarian Logistics, Disaster Management, Disaster Response, Relief Chain, Supply Chain Management

published: 31 Jan 2009

  • Topic: Operations
  • Industry: (Pharmaceutical) Public Private Partnerships
  • Region: Global

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Abstract:
Malaria causes over 1 million deaths per year, 90% of which are preventable. Drug resistance has become one of the most important barriers to effective treatment. The cheapest and most widely-used drugs are ineffective in most countries. Medicines for Malaria Venture (MMV) was founded in 1999 with the goal of developing new artemisinin combination therapies (ACT) to effectively treat the disease. A public-private-partnership, its mission is to discover, develop and deliver new treatments. With three new products in the final stages of development and a further 30 in the pipeline, MMV now faces challenges with the distribution of medicines whose development it has made possible.

Pedagogical Objectives:
- To look at complex problems in an unusual context. - While taking an operational perspective (production development and supply chain), to understand the entire process (from drug concept to efficient use in the field) and the links with other disciplines, distribution channels and pricing decisions, education and communication, private-public partnerships, financing models etc. - To explore the mission boundaries of an organisation like MMV.

Keywords:
Product Development, Public Private Partnership, Market Imperfections, Developing Countries, Access, Hmi, Emerging Markets, Hmi, Business Science

published: 18 Feb 2008

  • Topic: Responsibility
  • Industry: Non profit sector
  • Region: Global

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Abstract:
Global Impact is a US registered non-profit organisation dedicated to 'assuring help for the world's most vulnerable'. Representing more than 50 of the most respected US-based global charities, including CARE, Doctors Without Borders/Medecins Sans Frontiere, and World Vision, it raises funds for its charity members in workplaces across the US and overseas. Facing a decline in giving campaigns in the early 1990s, Global Impact increased its attention to private sector and corporate giving. The case examines how this non-profit organisation re-positioned itself between the corporate world and the global charity community, developing services to meet the needs of its new private sector-based donors, while continuing to serve its overall not-for-profit mission. Between 1995 and 2006, its charity revenues grew from $6 million to $141 million. The case begins in 1993 as a new CEO is hired, and the governing Board transitions from one dominated by charity member representatives, to one with broader private sector representation.

Pedagogical Objectives:
The case supports a rich in-class comparative discussion of differences and similarities between business and the social sector, highlighting how social, political and business constraints vary across sectors. The case illustrates best practice in business/social sector collaboration, particularly in the humanitarian and disaster relief context. This case is also a strategy case, profiling the entrepreneurial spirit of a management team driven by a non-profit mission, that responds to adverse market conditions (declining donations) by re-positioning the ?business? (charity fund-raising) to capture emerging opportunities in the private and corporate sector.

Keywords:
Non Profit Sector, Ethics, Charity, Charitable Giving, Philanthropy, Corporate Social Responsibility, Business-Social Sector Partnership, Disaster Relief, Humanitarian Relief, Development, Workplace Giving, Corporate Philanthropy, Corporate Governance, Investors, Stakeholders and Accountability

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