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Case Studies by Melanie Pipino

3 case studies

by Publication Date
published: 30 Nov 2018

  • Topic: Strategy
  • Region: Europe

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Abstract:
Charity fundraising in the UK was a deep red ocean when Comic Relief started. Costs were up and donations were down. To stand out from the crowd, organizations had to work harder at fundraising and marketing. Yet Comic Relief rapidly achieved 96 percent national brand awareness and has now raised over £1 billion without spending anything on marketing. Its flagship event, held once every two years, is almost a national holiday in the UK. The case reveals how Comic Relief redefined the problem of the charity-giving industry - from how to get the wealthy to give out of guilt, to how to get everyone ‘to do something funny for money’ – thus reconstructing the market boundaries. It understood how to create new demand by looking to nondonors and what turned them off (the blocks to giving). In so doing, it erected formidable barriers to imitation – cognitive, organisational, economic and legal. Its enduring success relies on the alignment of its value, profit and people propositions. It can be used to teach the following Blue Ocean concepts: (1) the Buyer Utility Map; (2) the Three Tiers of Noncustomers; (3) Barriers to Imitation; and (4) Disruptive versus nondisruptive creation.

Pedagogical Objectives:
• The central importance of noncustomers as a way to gain insights into how to create new demand and generate new growth. Instead of fighting for a greater percentage of existing donors, Comic Relief looked to noncustomers and what turned them off charitable giving, uncovering the major pain points imposed by the industry. This gave critical insight into how to open up new market space - a blue ocean of noncustomers • Barriers to imitation Barriers to imitation effectively prolong the sustainability of a blue ocean strategy, in this case the alignment of value, profit and people propositions, and cognitive, organizational, brand, economic and legal barriers – keeping challengers for many years. • Market creating-strategies are not synonymous with disruptive creation. Rather than replacing an earlier technology or existing product or service, Blue Ocean Shift | Strategy goes beyond disruption to embrace what Chan Kim and Renée Mauborgne call “nondisruptive creation” of a new market and with it new growth. While Comic Relief triggered a measure of disruption, it principally unlocked nondisruptive creation, where its gain didn’t come at the expense of others.

Keywords:
Social Services, Blue Ocean Strategy, Nonprofit Organization, Disruptive Creation, Nondisruptive Creation, Barriers to Imitation, Noncustomers, Market Creating Strategy, Charity, Blue Ocean Shift, Charity Fundraising

published: 11 Dec 2017

  • Topic: Strategy
  • Industry: National Commercial Banks
  • Region: Europe

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Abstract:
The case explains how Compte-Nickel found a blue ocean in the crowded French retail banking sector by identifying noncustomers and developing a strategy to attract them. Traditional banks focused on developing financial technology to make their offerings more appealing, whereas Compte-Nickel created a blue ocean by looking at the noncustomers the other banks ignored: low income earners and people facing financial exclusion.

Pedagogical Objectives:
1.Creating blue ocean businesses requires companies to look to noncustomers instead of concentrating on existing ones. This is at the core of value innovation. Rather than focus on customer differences, businesses break the cost-value tradeoff by increasing the value and reducing the cost for the buyer. This reorientation allows them to unlock a new mass of customers that did not exist in the existing market. 2.Participants will learn to use four blue ocean strategy analytic tools: - The Buyer Utility Map, which helps identifies blocks to buyer utility to increase demand - The Eliminate-Reduce-Raise-Create Grid, which analyzes which factors of competition to eliminate, reduce, raise, and create to unlock a blue ocean - The Strategy Canvas, the central diagnostic tool that graphically captures the current strategic landscape and a new blue ocean strategy -The Blue Ocean Idea Index, that analyzes whether the new strategy is commercially viable.

Keywords:
Blue Ocean Strategy, Banking, Finance, Fintech, Start-Up, Entrepreneurship, French Retail Bank, French Retail Bank, France.

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published: 22 Jul 2016

  • Topic: Strategy
  • Industry: National Commercial Banks
  • Region: Europe

Show details ...

Abstract:
The case explains how Compte-Nickel found a blue ocean in the crowded French retail banking sector by identifying noncustomers and developing a strategy to attract them. Traditional banks focused on developing financial technology to make their offerings more appealing, whereas Compte-Nickel created a blue ocean by looking at the noncustomers the other banks ignored: low income earners and people facing financial exclusion.

Pedagogical Objectives:
1. Creating blue ocean businesses requires companies to look to noncustomers instead of concentrating on existing ones. This is at the core of value innovation. Rather than focus on customer differences, businesses break the cost-value tradeoff by increasing the value and reducing the cost for the buyer. This reorientation allows them to unlock a new mass of customers that did not exist in the existing market. 2. Participants will learn to use four blue ocean strategy analytic tools: . The Buyer Utility Map, which helps identifies blocks to buyer utility to increase demand . The Eliminate-Reduce-Raise-Create Grid, which analyzes which factors of competition to eliminate, reduce, raise, and create to unlock a blue ocean . The Strategy Canvas, the central diagnostic tool that graphically captures the current strategic landscape and a new blue ocean strategy . The Blue Ocean Idea Index, that analyzes whether the new strategy is commercially viable.

Keywords:
Blue Ocean Strategy, Banking, Finance, Fintech, Start-Up, Entrepreneurship, French Retail Bank, France

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