INSEAD the business school for the world

Case Studies by Robert Crawford

39 case studies

by Publication Date
published: 25 Mar 2019

  • Topic: Strategy
  • Region: Europe

Show details ...

Abstract:
The case illustrates how Atos, a global leader in digital transformation, used a social networking based tool (blueKiwi) to replace email in its internal communications. The key to its successful deployment was the creation of professional communities (analogous to groups in Facebook) around specific issues. While the company was not able to rid itself of email completely, it did achieve increased efficiency in internal information sharing.

Pedagogical Objectives:
The case illustrates key concepts from “The Social Organization: How to Use Social Media to Tap the Collective Genius of your Customers and Employees” by Anthony J. Bradley and Mark P. McDonald. For social-media-based tools to be successfully deployed, firms should: • Define how the community collaboration experience should function, with a clear statement of purpose as a starting point. • Develop a “tipping point” plan, i.e. a strategy to spread awareness; aim for “viral expansion” (voluntary participation rather than top-down) to reach a sustainable community that should be guided and monitored, but not too closely. • Develop a suitable environment in which the community can congregate and collaborate (social media software, appropriate user experience, etc). Case (A) looks at problems associated with email as a communications medium and describes how blueKiwi, a social media type platform, allows people to communicate within communities around specific issues. Case (B) describes the outcomes, including measures used by Atos to evaluate the health of communities. BlueKiwi did allow the company to become more agile and built the foundation for work based on self-organizing teams.

Keywords:
Organizational Change, Social Media, Social Media Communities, Information Technology Company, Consulting, Agility

Related:

published: 25 Mar 2019

  • Topic: Strategy
  • Region: Europe

Show details ...

Abstract:
The case illustrates how Atos, a global leader in digital transformation, used a social networking based tool (blueKiwi) to replace email in its internal communications. The key to its successful deployment was the creation of professional communities (analogous to groups in Facebook) around specific issues. While the company was not able to rid itself of email completely, it did achieve increased efficiency in internal information sharing.

Pedagogical Objectives:
The case illustrates key concepts from “The Social Organization: How to Use Social Media to Tap the Collective Genius of your Customers and Employees” by Anthony J. Bradley and Mark P. McDonald. For social-media-based tools to be successfully deployed, firms should: • Define how the community collaboration experience should function, with a clear statement of purpose as a starting point. • Develop a “tipping point” plan, i.e. a strategy to spread awareness; aim for “viral expansion” (voluntary participation rather than top-down) to reach a sustainable community that should be guided and monitored, but not too closely. • Develop a suitable environment in which the community can congregate and collaborate (social media software, appropriate user experience, etc). Case (A) looks at problems associated with email as a communications medium and describes how blueKiwi, a social media type platform, allows people to communicate within communities around specific issues. Case (B) describes the outcomes, including measures used by Atos to evaluate the health of communities. BlueKiwi did allow the company to become more agile and built the foundation for work based on self-organizing teams.

Keywords:
Organizational Change, Social Media, Social Media Communities, Information Technology Company, Consulting, Agility

Related:

published: 28 Oct 2015

  • Topic: Responsibility
  • Industry: Healthcare: Emergency Medical Services
  • Region: Asia

Show details ...

Abstract:
Sweta Mangal, CEO of Ziqitza Health Care Limited, must decide how to respond to a government official who has demanded a bribe to release payment for the ambulance services ZHL provides. Bribery is commonplace in India, but there is also a growing anti-corruption movement. A new employee argues that the bribe is the only way for ZHL to make payroll and maintain its ambulances, which means more lives saved. Mangal insists that ZHL is committed to an anti-bribery stance. What is the right decision? How can it best be implemented?

Pedagogical Objectives:
1. To examine bribery - its distinguishing characteristics, different forms, the ethics involved , and the anti-bribery movement - as well as corporate responses to demands for bribes. 2. To highlight for social enterprises the importance of the means ('how it is done') as well as the ends in creating social as well as economic value.

Keywords:
Bribery, Corruption, Business Ethics, Social Enterprise, Social Entrepreneurship, India, Healthcare, Corporate Social Responsibility.

Related:

published: 29 Jun 2015

  • Topic: Responsibility
  • Industry: Pharmaceutical
  • Region: Global

Show details ...

Abstract:
In 2012, GlaxoSmithKline negotiated the largest health-fraud settlement to date with the U.S. Government over allegations of off-label marketing, bribing doctors, and failure to report drug safety problems. As well as the $3 billion settlement, GSK signed a five-year Corporate Integrity Agreement, which included corrective measures in sales and marketing practices.

Pedagogical Objectives:
1. To demonstrate the value of healthcare compliance management. 2. To explore challenges to effective compliance implementation, including the role of leadership and company culture. 3. To examine the tensions that can exist between sales goals and salesforce management practices that are consistent with corporate ethics, compliance and the long-term reputation of the firm.

Keywords:
Healthcare Compliance, Pharmaceutical Industry, Off-Label Marketing, Product Safety, Whistleblowers, Ethics, Salesforce Management, Corporate Reputation

published: 29 Jun 2015

  • Topic: Family Business
  • Industry: Retail distribution
  • Region: Europe

Show details ...

Abstract:
The Mulliez family owns one of the largest retail empires in the world. From its origins in northern France, its members have launched more than 20 different retail enterprises including Auchan (supermarkets), Boulanger (electronic devices), Decathlon (sports stores), Phildar (hosiery and yarn) and many other well-known brands. With more than 700 family members currently, they have nurtured a unique business model whereby new generations receive an in-house education and incentives are provided through innovative ownership design. The case identifies the contributions of the Mulliez family that underpin the conglomerate´s successful business strategy. It also analyses the challenges facing the family and its use of special governance structures to mitigate them.

Pedagogical Objectives:
The case highlights the role of leadership, the importance of culture, and the need for control systems. After reading and analysing the case, students will be able to: 1) Evaluate the importance of family assets. 2) Analyse to what extent the family values are transferable to new generations, including new family owners and professional managers. 3) See how the family implements business and governance strategies based on its assets.

Keywords:
Mulliez, Family, Business, Entrepreneurship, Distribution, Governance, Succession, Retail, European Competitiveness, Europe, Best Practices, Wicfe, Succession, Next Generation, Education, Entrepreneurship, Leadership, Governance, Parallel Planning, Strategy, Boards, Social Entrepreneurship, Impact Investing, Philanthropy, Family Office, Wealth Management, Legacy, Ownership

published: 24 Apr 2015

  • Topic: Strategy
  • Industry: Reverse Logistics
  • Region: Europe

Show details ...

Abstract:
Cycleon moved from a non-asset company centered around IT solutions for consumer returns to a reverse logistics service provider that facilitates the take-back and processing (repair and refurbishment) of different types of returns. This case describes the strategic decisions taken by the CEO during the transformation and expansion of Cycleon in the past 10 years.

Pedagogical Objectives:
The case illustrates entrepreneurship and business model reorientation as a promising start-up moves through turbulent waters, and has application to the unstructured market of product returns in the context of sustainable business.

Keywords:
Strategy, Leadership, Reverse Logistics, E-Commerce, Weee

Hermès Paris Award winner Prize Winner
published: 28 Apr 2014

  • Topic: Economics & Finance

Show details ...

Abstract:
This case is about options for ownership design in family businesses. The Hermès family takes the firm public in 1993 with the dual aim of enabling individual members to exit via selling shares on the market and generating funds to finance the company's growth. Fifteen years later, as LVMH prepares a hostile takeover bid for control of Hermès, the family fights to protect its ownership by creating a family trust to keep minority ownership interests in check.

Pedagogical Objectives:
1) To explain the prevalence of family firms in the luxury industry. 2) To apply the 'Family Business Map' to design family-assets-based business strategies and governance to avoid roadblocks. 3) Why family firms go public and in what way being a public firm is different from a private firm. 4) To understand that the way a family firm lists its shares can have long-term consequences for ownership and governance. 5) To show how family firms can be protected from hostile takeovers by creating a family trust. 6) To underline the legal limitations on the defensive strategies that family firms can deploy against hostile takeover bids, which vary from one country to another.

Keywords:
Luxury Industry, Ownership Design, Hostile Takeover Attempt, Family Ownership, Family Assets, Family Roadblocks, Family Trusts, Corporate Governance, Corporate Governance for Family Firms, Wicfe, Fair Process, Communication, Psychology, Gender, Governance, Parallel Planning, Strategy, Boards

Prizes won:
- Highly Commended at 2013 EFMD Case Writing Competition, Family Business Category

published: 28 Apr 2014

  • Topic: Responsibility
  • Industry: Media
  • Region: Europe

Show details ...

Abstract:
Over fifty years, Rupert Murdoch built one of the most successful media conglomerates in the world. Though there had been criticism of his conduct in the past, it was only in the new millennium that allegations of phone hacking and bribery brought the threat of massive legal action against both Murdoch and his companies.

Pedagogical Objectives:
1. To explore the leadership characteristics of Rupert Murdoch as the head of one of the world’s most successful media conglomerates and in the context of charges of unethical and illegal conduct. 2. To examine the causes of the misconduct and the extent to which it can be attributed to “bad apples” (individuals) versus “bad barrels” (organizational factors) and Murdoch’s leadership of News Corp. 3. To examine responsible leadership in business – what is required of the responsible business leader?

Keywords:
Business Ethics, Responsible Leadership, Corporate Social Responsibility, Leadership, Bribery, Media, Phone Hacking, Journalistic Ethics, Corporate Governance, Auditing, Risk Control and Performance, Wicfe, Governance, Parallel Planning, Strategy, Boards

published: 24 Mar 2014

  • Topic: Operations
  • Industry: Oyster
  • Region: Asia

Show details ...

Abstract:
In the wake of the tsunami, a number of entrepreneurs decide to seize the opportunity to modernize the industry and change their business models, although many obstacles remain. In this context, the case examines the characteristics of the Japanese economy, the behaviour and expectations of consumers, and the process of innovation. The business case can be made, as well as some analysis of the country’s ailing economic system.

Pedagogical Objectives:
. In its simplest form, the issue of disaster response . Social responsibility, either for companies or individuals. . Business model innovation opportunities for entrepreneurs in situations of rapid change . The capabilities that a social entrepreneur needs

Keywords:
Disaster Response, Social Responsibility, Business Model Innovation, Social Entrepreneur, Japan, Tsunami, Oysters

published: 27 May 2013

  • Topic: Responsibility
  • Industry: Healthcare: Emergency Medical Services
  • Region: Asia

Show details ...

Abstract:
Sweta Mangal, CEO of Ziqitza Health Care Limited, must decide how to respond to a government official who has demanded a bribe to release payment for the ambulance services ZHL provides. Bribery is commonplace in India, but there is also a growing anti-corruption movement. A new employee argues that the bribe is the only way for ZHL to make payroll and maintain its ambulances, which means more lives saved. Mangal insists that ZHL is committed to an anti-bribery stance. What is the right decision? How can it best be implemented?

Pedagogical Objectives:
1. To examine bribery - its distinguishing characteristics, different forms, the ethics involved , and the anti-bribery movement - as well as corporate responses to demands for bribes. 2. To highlight for social enterprises the importance of the means ('how it is done') as well as the ends in creating social as well as economic value.

Keywords:
Bribery, Corruption, Business Ethics, Social Enterprise, Social Entrepreneurship, India, Healthcare, Corporate Social Responsibility

Prizes won:
- Third Place in oikos Case Writing Competition 2013, Social Entrepreneurship Category

Related:

by Publication Date


Share