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Case Studies by Bowen White

7 case studies

by Publication Date
published: 15 Dec 2017

  • Topic: Entrepreneurship
  • Industry: Local and Suburban Passenger Transportation
  • Region: Middle-East

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Abstract:
Careem, a Dubai-based ride-hailing company, was founded in 2012 in the United Arab Emirates (UAE) by two ex-McKinsey consultants who saw a gap in the transport market. Started as a web-based car booking service for corporate clients, Careem had evolved into a leading application-based booking service in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region, with a differentiated business model tailored to the tastes and preferences of Middle Eastern consumers. Fuelled by venture capital funding rounds in September 2013 and December 2014, Careem was again on the fundraising trail in 2015 for a Series C investment round to further scale its existing business and continue its roll-out across MENA. The Abraaj Group, a leading emerging markets private equity investor, was interested, but with Uber competing fiercely in the MENA region, it had to decide whether Careem could compete with its well-funded global competitor.

Pedagogical Objectives:
This case helps students understand: • The evolution of a successful start-up, from concept to funding to scaling. • The challenges faced by operators of early-stage companies and the key questions and metrics considered by investors in early-stage companies. • The convergence of traditional venture capital and private equity roles in the late-stage venture capital market. • How private equity investors add value to their portfolio companies and differentiate themselves in the market. • How global business models in the “new economy” can be modified and refined to suit consumer preferences and provide a competitive advantage in emerging markets.

Keywords:
Ride-Hailing, Mena, Smart Devices, Digital Disruption, Smart Apps, Uber, Start-Up, Private Equity

published: 29 May 2017

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Abstract:
In 2011, Partners Group is nearing the end of a year-long quest for a new mandate from a European pension fund, Future Plan. The fund has struggled with its 6-year old PE programme, consistently falling short of its target allocation to the asset class and generating poor returns, seemingly always one step behind the opportunity in the market. Future Plan has built its PE programme by investing in closed-end funds of PE products managed by two executives, one focused on European markets, the other on global markets. But the fallout from the global economic crisis wreaked havoc with Future Plan’s PE programme and something has to change. With an interest in expanding its PE activity to include secondary and direct investment strategies, Future Plan begins a manager search process with one goal in mind: to achieve the target return to the asset class by 2014. The case charts Partners Group’s role in the selection process and how its expertise and services, along with a novel holding structure, offer a way to achieve Future Plan’s goals.

Pedagogical Objectives:
This case provides a ringside seat to follow the actions taken by a medium-sized pension fund when managing its private equity portfolio allocation. Students explore the rationale behind making investment decisions, the key challenges faced by institutional investors when constructing and managing a PE portfolio, and compare the characteristics of primary, secondary and direct PE investments. The case provides data and a step-by-step guide for students to develop an investment strategy (across these three categories) that will enable Future Plan to hit its target allocation to PE by year-end 2014 and achieve its goals.

Keywords:
Private Equity, Partners Group, Pension Fund, Institutional Investor, Portfolio Construction, Portfolio Management, Portfolio Optimization, Target Asset Allocation, Global Financial Crisis, Direct Investment, Secondary Investment, Primary Fund Commitment, Limited Partner, Private Equity Programme

published: 26 Aug 2016

  • Topic: Entrepreneurship
  • Industry: Private Equity
  • Region: Europe

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Abstract:
George Bachiashvili, deputy CEO of the Partnership Fund, is asked by the Prime Minister of Georgia to create an investment vehicle funded entirely with private capital for local investments. The goal is to spur foreign investment and stimulate long-term economic growth in the country. Having no precedent for such a vehicle in Georgia, George has to identify best practice from other sources to get it off the ground. Georgia clearly needs capital but is not on the radar of most international investors. However, the US$1 billion anchor investment pledged by the PM with no strings attached gives it some serious chips in the game. Even so, “frontier markets” are among the most challenging contexts in which to raise private funding, as capital deployment is often hindered by an unstable political environment, weak institutions and corruption. The task is daunting but, if successful, could transform the economy. The case describes in detail the different options for finding investors.

Pedagogical Objectives:
Students should be able to address the following issues: 1. Identify the mission of the fund, and the strategic and financial goals behind it. 2. The type of additional investors to be targeted for this type of fund e.g., global or regional, pension funds, funds of funds, sovereign wealth funds, high net worth individuals, family offices, development finance institutions. 3. Draw up a comprehensive investment strategy for such a fund. 4. Identify which private equity fund structure would best enable George to fulfil the fund’s strategic and financial objectives, satisfy the needs of the LP base, and execute his investment strategy.

Keywords:
Private Equity, Georgia, Frontier Martkets, Funds, Gpei, Gpei-Case

published: 26 Aug 2016

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Abstract:
The case describes how the Pro-invest Group – a boutique investment firm specialising in private equity real estate and real estate asset management – built its business and raised a first-time private equity fund. The Pro-invest founders had boot-strapped the business since its inception in 2013, but in-house funds were running out by mid-2014 and they needed third-party capital to take the venture to the next level. After deciding on a suitable fund structure, the Pro-invest team hits the fundraising trail. Turmoil erupts when a potential investor pulls out at the last minute, leaving the team in shock to re-evaluate its fundraising options. The case explores the pros and cons of each option in detail.

Pedagogical Objectives:
The case allows students to evaluate the different options when creating a new fund, and more generally to understand the fundraising options available for PE funds, especially first time funds. They should be able to: 1. Understand the central elements (e.g. control, economics) that private equity fund managers consider when raising capital. 2. Gain insight into the fundraising dynamics in the real estate private equity industry. 3. Step into the shoes of a fund manager’s Management Committee and evaluate the pros and cons of the various fundraising options, from institutional investors to family offices. 4. Appreciate the questions and due diligence requirements of large institutional investors before allocating funds to a real estate PE fund. 5. Appreciate the challenges of balancing the efforts of fundraising and executing investments in parallel, in particular when raising a first-time fund.

Keywords:
Private Equity, Real Estate, Fundraising, Australia, Hotel Industry, First-Time Fund, Fund Structure, Global Financial Crisis, Pere, Family Office, Gpei, Gpei-Case

published: 28 Apr 2014

  • Topic: Economics & Finance
  • Industry: Infrastructure
  • Region: Other Regions

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Abstract:
BrisConnections won the bid to construct the Airport Link toll road under a BOOT (Build, Own, Operate and Transfer) PPP model just as the global financial crisis took hold in 2008. Soon the project would take its place among a string of Australian toll road project failures.

Pedagogical Objectives:
To examine the public infrastructure fund model, the Australian public private partnership (PPP) toll road model, and the roles of various public and private stakeholders in the Airport Link project. To value the project and examine the assumptions underlying the model. To trace the impact of the project's failure and re-examine the project structure.

Keywords:
Project Finance, Toll Road, Financial Crisis, Infrastructure Fund, Default, Underwriters, Public Private Partnership (ppp), Conflict of Interest

Related:

published: 28 Apr 2014

  • Topic: Economics & Finance
  • Industry: Infrastructure
  • Region: Other Regions

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Abstract:
BrisConnections won the bid to construct the Airport Link toll road under a BOOT (Build, Own, Operate and Transfer) PPP model just as the global financial crisis took hold in 2008. Soon the project would take its place among a string of Australian toll road project failures.

Pedagogical Objectives:
To examine the public infrastructure fund model, the Australian public private partnership (PPP) toll road model, and the roles of various public and private stakeholders in the Airport Link project. To value the project and examine the assumptions underlying the model. To trace the impact of the project's failure and re-examine the project structure.

Keywords:
Project Finance, Toll Road, Financial Crisis, Infrastructure Fund, Default, Underwriters, Public Private Partnership (ppp), Conflict of Interest

Related:

published: 26 Nov 2012

  • Topic: Economics & Finance
  • Industry: Automotive
  • Region: Europe

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Abstract:
In September 2010, Dürr AG issued a corporate bond without the use of underwriters or rating agencies via a new bond issuance platform developed by Boerse Stuttgart. This reflected a growing trend among European corporations to tap capital markets instead of bank debt to secure debt financing.

Pedagogical Objectives:
To explore the sources of corporate debt financing following the global financial crisis and compare the costs of funding via corporate bonds and bank debt markets. The case materials allow students to develop a deeper understanding of sharing credit risk among different debt instruments and how this is reflected in credit spreads.

Keywords:
Corporate Debt Disintermediation, Corporate Bond Issuance, Bank Debt, Basel III Regulation, Global Financial Crisis, Corporate Funding Alternative, Credit Risk, Credit Spreads, European Competitiveness, Europe

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