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Award Winning & Best Selling Cases

Did you know that INSEAD wrote 6 of the 10 best-selling cases distributed by the Case Centre in the past 40 years? That INSEAD cases were the Overall Winner of 5 of the last 10 Case Centre Global Case Awards? And that INSEAD cases are used in more than 100 business schools and universities around the world?

176 case studies

published: 11 Oct 2017

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Abstract:


In 2017, the Financial Times ranked INSEAD’s MBA programme #1 in the world for the second year in a row. The Dean of INSEAD, Ilian Mihov, commissioned a large-scale study to understand the shool’s brand equity compared to its peers. The goal is to optimize INSEAD’s positioning, value proposition and communication, to attract the best MBA students. Case A asks students to develop a survey that will measure the strengths and weaknesses of the INSEAD brand compared to its key competitors. They must select the performance measures, relevant competitors and the relevant sample. Case B provides results from a survey of 4,000 GMAT-takers who rated 18 business schools. Students analyze the data to measure the strength of the INSEAD brand and its image compared with its competitors. To optimize the school’s positioning, students must identify the most important attributes used when choosing an MBA programme.
Please visit the dedicated case website to access supplementary material.

Pedagogical Objectives:
This case can be used for many different audiences and contexts. It can be used for discussion in MBA, undergraduate, or executive education courses focusing on branding, brand metrics, marketing research, customer intelligence, data analytics, customer centricity, general marketing strategy, communication and social media strategy, consumer behavior, and international marketing.

Keywords:
Business Schools, Strategic Market Intelligence, Brand Management, Brand Equity Analysis, Brand Metrics, Marketing Research, Data Analytics, Multivariate Analyses, Research Design, Insead, Mba Programme

Prizes won:
- Prix de la Meilleure Etude de Cas par AFM/CCMP - Best Case Study Award by AFM/CCMP

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published: 11 Oct 2017

Show details ...

Abstract:


In 2017, the Financial Times ranked INSEAD’s MBA programme #1 in the world for the second year in a row. The Dean of INSEAD, Ilian Mihov, commissioned a large-scale study to understand the shool’s brand equity compared to its peers. The goal is to optimize INSEAD’s positioning, value proposition and communication, to attract the best MBA students. Case A asks students to develop a survey that will measure the strengths and weaknesses of the INSEAD brand compared to its key competitors. They must select the performance measures, relevant competitors and the relevant sample. Case B provides results from a survey of 4,000 GMAT-takers who rated 18 business schools. Students analyze the data to measure the strength of the INSEAD brand and its image compared with its competitors. To optimize the school’s positioning, students must identify the most important attributes used when choosing an MBA programme.
Please visit the dedicated case website to access supplementary material.

Pedagogical Objectives:
This case can be used for many different audiences and contexts. It can be used for discussion in MBA, undergraduate, or executive education courses focusing on branding, brand metrics, marketing research, customer intelligence, data analytics, customer centricity, general marketing strategy, communication and social media strategy, consumer behavior, and international marketing.

Keywords:
Business Schools, Strategic Market Intelligence, Brand Management, Brand Equity Analysis, Brand Metrics, Marketing Research, Data Analytics, Multivariate Analyses, Research Design, Insead, Mba Programme

Prizes won:
- Best Case Study Award by AFM/CCMP 2018

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published: 06 Jun 2018

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Abstract:
Chocolate candy marketers like Mars, Nestlé, Hershey and Ferrero are under pressure to respond to the stricter nutritional targets set by governments, changing consumer tastes, and competition from healthier brands like Kind or Cliff. Should traditional chocolate makers reformulate their products with less sugar content (and if so, should they announce it)? Should they reduce portion or package sizes (and if so, should they reduce prices)? More generally, is obesity their responsibility? Is collaboration with competitors, researchers and advocacy groups the solution? How can they grow their business without contributing to the obesity epidemic?
Please visit the dedicated case website to access supplementary material.

Pedagogical Objectives:
This case examines whether food marketing can be a force for good in helping to align business with consumer health and pleasure. It addresses key issues such as how to manage food claims (and perceptions) and downsizing in a category disrupted by start-ups like Kind. A comprehensive teaching note and detailed PowerPoint presentation divulge the latest research findings in this domain – e.g., on the causes and consequences of obesity, health halos, perceptions of portion size, and ‘epicurean nudging’ (or how focusing on pleasure, not health, can make people happier to spend more on food yet eat less).

Keywords:
Food, Marketing, Nutrition, Health, Packaging, Portion Size, Chocolate, Innovation, Retailing, Responsibility, Sustainability, Ethics, Branding, Regulation

Prizes won:
- Third Prize in the Corporate Sustainability track of oikos Case Writing Competition 2018

published: 28 May 2018

  • Topic: Responsibility
  • Industry: Automotive
  • Region: Global

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Abstract:
The case is a detailed ‘inside’ account of the ‘dieselgate’ scandal at Volkswagen which revealed how engineers had programmed software that enabled its cars to cheat emissions tests. It explores the origins of internal and external forces that propelled the company to market environmentally sustainable “clean diesel” cars while using engine management software to conceal on-the-road emissions of over 40 times the permitted levels. The scandal - one of the biggest of the decade – illustrates contributing factors that are common to many instances of organizational misconduct: obedience to authority, organizational culture, goal-setting, and corporate governance.

Pedagogical Objectives:
1. To understand how ethical and social responsibility issues arise in business at the level of the individual, the organization, and society. 2. To identify and analyse the individual and organizational factors that give rise to organizational misconduct. 3. To consider how such factors can be mitigated, and the implications for responsible business leadership, organizational design, and corporate governance. 4. To discuss corporate hypocrisy – how an organization with a reputation for engineering excellence could market “clean diesel” cars and programme them to cheat emissions tests. 5. To explore the industry and societal consequences of organizational misconduct by a major player in the automotive industry. 6. To consider the role of rationalisations in justifying misconduct by individuals. 7. To apply the fraud triangle framework to explore risks of organizational misconduct. 8. To discuss effective crisis-management responses.

Keywords:
Environmental Responsibility, Organizational Misconduct, Vehicle Emissions, Sustainability, Corporate Social Responsibility, Business Ethics, Organizational Culture, Leadership, Green Marketing, Volkswagen, Automotive Industry, Pollution, Fraud Triangle, Crisis Management

Prizes won:
- Second Prize in the Corporate Sustainability track of oikos Case Writing Competition 2018

published: 25 Sep 2017

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Abstract:
Read a related Knowledge article " Brazil’s X Factor " by Felipe Monteiro.

This is a condensed version of the cases EBX Group (A): Eike Batista and the X-Factor/EBX Group (B): Autopsy of a failure. It describes the boom and bust of the EBX Group and its founder, Eike Batista. The first part traces the history of the Brazilian conglomerate from its origins as a small gold-mining operation in the early 1980s to 2012 when it has become a diversified national and global player in multiple industries. It examines Batista’s personal drive, motivations and choices, and how these influenced the strategy deployed by the company. Known for his huge ‘risk appetite’, Batista had an extraordinary ability to exploit gaps in the market when starting new businesses. The second part of the case recounts the “historic” downfall of the ‘X Empire’ which was of a magnitude and speed never seen before in the history. Batista’s personal net worth of US$30 billion – making him the seventh wealthiest person in the world and the richest in Brazil – had plummeted to US$200 million as debts piled up and the stock price went into freefall. In January 2014, Bloomberg reported that Batista had “a negative net worth”.
Please visit the dedicated case website to access supplementary material.

Pedagogical Objectives:
The case illustrates and explains the following: 1. The assets and liabilities of one of the world’s largest emerging markets – Brazil. 2. The concept of ‘institutional voids’ in emerging markets, and how companies both overcome and capitalize on these to create distinct value. 3. How business groups are formed and add value in emerging markets. 4. The challenges of making the transition from an entrepreneurial business to an operational one. 5. The concept of organizational ambidexterity – how firms need to be both entrepreneurial and innovative as well as operationally efficient – the ability to both exploit and explore. 6. Diseconomies of time compression

Keywords:
Mining, Oil & Gas, Diversified Conglomerates, Emerging Markets, Brazil, Institutional Voids, Entrepreneurship, South America

Prizes won:
- Winner of the EFMD Case Writing Competition 2017 in the Category “Latin American Business Cases”

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published: 24 Jul 2017

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Abstract:
The Swiss company TAG Heuer, maker of luxury watches, is part of the LVMH group (Moet Hennessy Louis Vuitton). In 2015, CEO Jean-Claude Biver is deciding whether to launch its first-ever fully connected Swiss watch, manufactured in partnership with Google and Intel. Entering this new market presents an unprecedented challenge: making a watch based on a technology (microprocessors) that the Swiss have not mastered. Is Tag Heuer ready to compete in the digital space - and potentially without the traditional 'Swiss Made' label? Case B takes up the story following the successful launch of the TAG Heuer connected watch. Sales are beyond all expectations for the luxury Swiss watchmaker and its partners Intel and Google. There are a few surprises too – the consumers are older than they expected and the watches sell out far quicker than anticipated – hence the company runs into some supply chain issues.
Please visit the dedicated case website to access supplementary material.

Pedagogical Objectives:
To learn how a nation achieves international success in a specific industry and how multinational corporations enable the emergence of clusters and benefit from them. In particular, how the Swiss luxury watch industry (in particular TAG Heuer) reacted and dealt with the challenge from connected watches such as the Apple Watch. Four key issues are addressed: 1. The importance of the 'Swiss Made' label for this market. 2. How to make a connected watch 'eternal' in the spirit of traditional mechanical watches. 3. How TAG Heuer prepared for a profound digital transformation by learning from the technology cluster in Silicon Valley (locating a team of engineers there and managing the partnership with Google and Intel). 4. How a company dealt with digital disruption in a conservative industry – Swiss watchmaking. 5. How multinationals identify technology in other clusters – “technology scouting” - and set up relevant processes.

Keywords:
Watches, Luxury, Wearables, Connected Watches, Digital Transformation, Google, Intel, Clusters, Jean-Claude Biver, Global Strategy, Digital Disruption, Apple Watch, Swissmade, Silicon Valley, Switzerland

Prizes won:
- Outstanding Case Writer: Hot Topic 'Disruptive Change', The Case Centre Competitions 2018

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published: 21 Apr 2017

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Abstract:
The Swiss company TAG Heuer, maker of luxury watches, is part of the LVMH group (Moet Hennessy Louis Vuitton). In 2015, CEO Jean-Claude Biver is deciding whether to launch its first-ever fully connected Swiss watch, manufactured in partnership with Google and Intel. Entering this new market presents an unprecedented challenge: making a watch based on a technology (microprocessors) that the Swiss have not mastered. Is TAG Heuer ready to compete in the digital space - and potentially without the traditional 'Swiss Made' label? Case B takes up the story following the successful launch of the TAG Heuer connected watch. Sales are beyond all expectations for the luxury Swiss watchmaker and its partners Intel and Google. There are a few surprises too – the consumers are older than they expected and the watches sell out far quicker than anticipated – hence the company runs into some supply chain issues.
Please visit the dedicated case website to access supplementary material.

Pedagogical Objectives:
To learn how a nation achieves international success in a specific industry and how multinational corporations enable the emergence of clusters and benefit from them. In particular, how the Swiss luxury watch industry (in particular TAG Heuer) reacted and dealt with the challenge from connected watches such as the Apple Watch. Four key issues are addressed: 1. The importance of the 'Swiss Made' label for this market. 2. How to make a connected watch 'eternal' in the spirit of traditional mechanical watches. 3. How TAG Heuer prepared for a profound digital transformation by learning from the technology cluster in Silicon Valley (locating a team of engineers there and managing the partnership with Google and Intel). 4. How a company dealt with digital disruption in a conservative industry – Swiss watchmaking. 5. How multinationals identify technology in other clusters – “technology scouting” - and set up relevant processes.

Keywords:
Watches, Luxury, Wearables, Connected Watches, Digital Transformation, Google, Intel, Clusters, Jean-Claude Biver, Global Strategy, Digital Disruption, Apple Watch, Swissmade, Silicon Valley, Switzerland

Prizes won:
- Outstanding Case Writer: Hot Topic 'Disruptive Change', The Case Centre Competitions 2018

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published: 26 Aug 2016

  • Industry: Retail, Technology, eCommerce
  • Region: Global

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Abstract:
After 18 months of attempting to transition the company to holacracy, Tony Hsieh, Zappos’ celebrity CEO, decided it was time to make the change happen. In March 2015, he sent an email to all Zappos employees offering them 3 months’ severance pay if they felt that self-management was not for them. One month later, 14% of the workforce had quit, including 20% of the tech department, potentially putting at risk a complex transition to a new online platform mandated by parent company Amazon. The case recounts how Tony Hsieh financed, championed, and ultimately became CEO of online shoe retailer Zappos. A passionate entrepreneur who made millions at a young age, Hsieh was known for his penthouse parties, for what he referred to as his “tribe”. He brought the same sense of community to Zappos, which he moved from San Francisco to Las Vegas where employees could “be like family”. Despite the company’s unabashedly weird culture, it had the lowest employee turnover rate in the industry. Widely admired for its outstanding customer service, Zappos was repeatedly listed among Fortune’s “Best Places To Work.” When in 2009 Amazon acquired Zappos for $1.2 billion, it promised to preserve its management and culture. But Hsieh’s decision to implement holacracy – a form of organizational self-management that replaces job titles and hierarchy with “circles” that employees step in and out of according to their preferences and skills – was less popular than hoped. Hence his “rip the Band-Aid” approach, to ensure that only employees committed to the change remained at the company.

Pedagogical Objectives:
- Analyzing the role of culture in developing an organization’s competitive advantage - Discussing the purpose and impact of structure on those within an organization - Understanding the emotional experience of organizational change - Evaluating leadership in the context of radical change

Keywords:
Organizational Culture, Structure, Organizational Change, Leadership, Leading Change, Management, Holacracy

Prizes won:
- 2018 Case Awards Winner, Human Resource Management / Organisational Behaviour Category, Case Centre
- 2017 Case Centre Best-selling Case in Human Resource Management / Organisational Behaviour

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published: 26 Aug 2016

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Abstract:
Read a related Knowledge article "Lessons in Digital Transformation from the Hotel Industry" by David Dubois.

The case focuses on AccorHotels’ ambitious digital transformation, aiming to put the customer back at the center of its strategy and operations. Responding to a powerful wave of digital disruptions in the hospitality ecosystem, from the emergence of review websites, online travel agents and active forums to the rise of new competitors such as Airbnb, the transformation entailed: (1) designing and implementing an innovative content marketing strategy (including online content creation or co-creation, curation and dissemination) (2) incorporating e-reputation as a core business objective, and (3) creating and/or adapting organizational structures – from management to operations – to support this new dynamic and maximize value creation.
The case starts in Fall 2015, when Olivier Arnoux, SVP Customer Satisfaction at AccorHotels, and his team, are asked to devise an ambitious plan to address the new challenges facing major players in the hotel industry brought about by digital disruptions. It follows the decision-making process step by step, from (1) understanding the nature and impact of online content in the customer journey, to (2) building a strategic plan to integrate online insights into AccorHotels’ core business objectives (in particular the importance of e-reputation), (3) redefining where and how value is created, and creating incentive structures aligned with the new objectives. Participants have multiple opportunities to put themselves in the shoes of the protagonists so as to understand the logic behind the decisions taken.
What is novel is the systematic articulation of how digital and social media impact the customer journey, as well as the integration of online content into marketing strategy (i.e., content marketing) and organizational design (i.e., team structure, incentive system), underlining how embracing the digital revolution entails breaking traditional silos between functions such as marketing, strategy, finance and human resources.
Detailed information on the consumer, the ecosystem, the firm, marketing and financial indicators is provided. Teaching notes and accompanying PowerPoint presentations suggest appropriate classroom exercises and include supplemental material and databases for group exercises. Videos provide insight on what drove the digital transformation and vividly illustrate its implementation and initial impressive results. They include interviews with Emilie Couton (Vice President Digital Marketing Asia Pacific), a video-recorded session of Olivier Arnoux on the digital transformation at AccorHotels, as well as examples of content created or co-created by AccorHotels.
Please visit the dedicated case website to access supplementary material.

Pedagogical Objectives:
This case offers a forum to discuss what it means for a company to engage its digital transformation in order to foster customer-centricity. A discussion of the nature and role of online content in shifting consumer behavior in the hoteling industry serves as a basis to explore how companies can create value at different points of the customer journey and what these steps entail. The case also touches on a variety of important strategic, organizational and operational decisions that the company must undertake to fully leverage online content and can be used to address the following broad questions (Specific questions are available in the teaching note): 1) How does online content stemming from digital and social media create value in the hoteling industry? 2) How can a company actively manage online content and implement a content strategy? and 3) What aspects of its organizational design a company need to remodel in order to maximize value creation through digital and social media.

Keywords:
Digital Transformation, Content Marketing, Customer Centricity, Hoteling & Tourism, Social Media Marketing, Customer Journey, Consumer Experiences, Digital Disruptions e-Reputation, Reputation Management, Accorhotels Booking Airbnb, Tripadvisor, Online Reviews, Social Media Listening, Digital Organizational Integration, Corporate Governance, Value Creation, Strategy and Implementation

Prizes won:
- 2018 Case Awards Winner, Marketing Category, Case Centre
- 2017 Case Centre Best-selling Case in Marketing
- 2017 AFM-CCMP Award for the Best case study in Marketing, Finalist

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published: 25 Jan 2016

  • Topic: Strategy
  • Industry: Automobile
  • Region: Global

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Abstract:
The Tesla case provides multiple opportunities to discuss core strategy and innovation topics, such as: • Patterns of innovation, e.g., new technologies competing to replace older generations • Types of disruption, e.g., low-end versus high-end • The innovation ecosystem, e.g., thinking beyond a single technology to the interdependence of an ecosystem of supporting technologies • Systems strategy, e.g., thinking beyond the product to understand the role of technology architecture and systems • The innovation process, e.g. learning under conditions of uncertainty, scaling up for execution.

Pedagogical Objectives:
The teaching note is organized around a set of discussion questions that bring out each of these issues in the case. Videos of Tesla’s factory (available online) can be used to make the case more vivid, or compared with a video of a General Motors manufacturing plant to inspire further discussion (URLs are cited at the end of the case).

Keywords:
Innovation, Disruption, Technology Change, Architectural Innovation, Technology Strategy, Systems, Radical Innovation, Entrepreneurship, Corporate Governance, Value Creation, Strategy and Implementation

Prizes won:
- 2018 Case Awards Winner, Strategy and General Management Category, Case Centre


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