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Award Winning & Best Selling Cases

Did you know that INSEAD wrote 6 of the 10 best-selling cases distributed by the Case Centre in the past 40 years? That INSEAD cases were the Overall Winner of 5 of the last 10 Case Centre Global Case Awards? And that INSEAD cases are used in more than 100 business schools and universities around the world?

185 case studies

published: 01 Oct 2003

  • Topic: Leadership & Organisations
  • Region: Global

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Abstract:
Case A: Mark Chan worked for a British multinational in Singapore and was posted on an international assignment to its corporate headquarters in London. He performed well at his job and enjoyed a successful international career. When he and his wife decided to return home, he was unable to find a position that was requisite with his experience and skills back at the company’s Singapore subsidiary. The case ends with Mark Chan wondering what he should do. Case B: Mark Chan decided to move back home to Singapore and accepted a lower rank position compared to the one he held overseas. He started to feel bored with his job after a few months. His attempts to find a new job that was requisite with his experience and skills within his company did not yield any results. His wife and children also experienced problems adjusting back to life in Singapore. The case ends with Mark Chan taking the first step to find a new job.

Pedagogical Objectives:
The main teaching objectives are to illustrate the impact of an international assignment on career advancement and professional development, the career-related dilemmas faced by expatriate managers and the difficulties awaiting them upon return from an overseas assignment. Family re-adjustment problems are also highlighted. Students must reflect on the factors that contributed to re-entry problems, and explore approaches to improve international career management and repatriation practices.

Keywords:
International Assignments, Expatriate Management, Repatriation, International Human Resource Management, Careers, Career Management, Leadership Development

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published: 25 Apr 2019

  • Topic: Responsibility
  • Region: Asia

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Abstract:
In 2013, India passed a law to make corporate social responsibility mandatory for large companies. The case examines the context in which the CSR legislation was introduced and how Tata Motors Ltd (TML) responded to it. Case (A) explores the meaning of corporate social responsibility and the question of whether a company should put community projects before profits. Case (B) examines Tata Motors’ CSR programmes in depth and provides an opportunity to consider their impact. Students are challenged to come up with their own ideas for how the philosophy of “more from less for more” can be used to address issues related to poverty and lack of education in India.

Pedagogical Objectives:
1. Explore the meaning and practice of corporate social responsibility and the normative (moral) and instrumental (business case) motivations for companies to engage in it as a voluntary activity. 2. Understand why the Indian government mandated CSR (by the Companies Act 2013) and its implications for companies and their stakeholders, in response to pressing social needs. 3. Consider the impact of CSR programmes, how it can be increased, and ways it can be measured using a Social Return on Investment methodology. 4. Explore the benefits of board involvement in CSR policy-making and reporting. 5. Encourage students to come up with their own ideas about how to do “more from less for more” in India and elsewhere.

Keywords:
Corporate Social Responsibility, India, Government Regulation, Csr Mandate, Social Return on Investment, Corporate Governance, Poverty, Skills Training, Motor Industry, Board of Directors, Kpmg

Prizes won:
- Winner 2018 EFMD Case Writing Competition

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published: 25 Apr 2019

  • Topic: Responsibility
  • Region: Asia

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Abstract:
In 2013, India passed a law to make corporate social responsibility mandatory for large companies. The case examines the context in which the CSR legislation was introduced and how Tata Motors Ltd (TML) responded to it. Case (A) explores the meaning of corporate social responsibility and the question of whether a company should put community projects before profits. Case (B) examines Tata Motors’ CSR programmes in depth and provides an opportunity to consider their impact. Students are challenged to come up with their own ideas for how the philosophy of “more from less for more” can be used to address issues related to poverty and lack of education in India.

Pedagogical Objectives:
1. Explore the meaning and practice of corporate social responsibility and the normative (moral) and instrumental (business case) motivations for companies to engage in it as a voluntary activity. 2. Understand why the Indian government mandated CSR (by the Companies Act 2013) and its implications for companies and their stakeholders, in response to pressing social needs. 3. Consider the impact of CSR programmes, how it can be increased, and ways it can be measured using a Social Return on Investment methodology. 4. Explore the benefits of board involvement in CSR policy-making and reporting. 5. Encourage students to come up with their own ideas about how to do “more from less for more” in India and elsewhere.

Keywords:
Corporate Social Responsibility, India, Government Regulation, Csr Mandate, Social Return on Investment, Corporate Governance, Poverty, Skills Training, Motor Industry, Board of Directors, Kpmg

Prizes won:
- Winner 2018 EFMD Case Writing Competition

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published: 31 Aug 2018

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Abstract:
Serial social entrepreneur Andreas Souvaliotis is looking at new ways to achieve his lifelong mission: to improve the health and wellness of his Canadian compatriots. His previous venture, Green Rewards, demonstrated the power of loyalty rewards to promote environmentally-conscious purchases. Andreas is now looking to impact non-commercial habits like walking more, eating less, as well as education. The health and wellness market is growing but hyper competitive, with more than 150,000 apps available on Google Play or on the App Store. B2B or B2C? Fitness, nutrition or mindfulness? Fee, freemium or free? Stand-alone or in collaboration? These are the key questions students must address to help Andreas and his team achieve their goal - and make a profit.
Please visit the dedicated case website to access supplementary material.

Pedagogical Objectives:
This decision-oriented case examines the health and wellness market and, more generally, the topic of behavior modification. Thanks to close collaboration with Carrot Insight, detailed information about what the team did and why, as well as their future plans, is provided through video interviews available on the case website and in the teaching note.

Keywords:
Food, Marketing, Nutrition, Health, Exercising, Fitness, Loyalty, Government, Incentive, Responsibility, Mobile Commerce, Habits, Branding, Regulation

Prizes won:
- Winner 2018 EFMD Case Writing Competition

published: 30 Jul 2018

  • Topic: Responsibility
  • Industry: Technology
  • Region: North America

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Abstract:
In April 2018, after it became known that Google was collaborating with the US Department of Defense on Project Maven, over 3,000 employees signed an internal memo asking CEO Sundar Pichai to (a) cancel the project immediately, and (b) enforce a policy stating that the company would never build warfare technology. Project Maven had been launched in early 2017 as part of the DoD’s efforts to integrate AI and machine learning into its defense strategies. Drones, robots and AI were increasingly deployed in intelligence gathering and combat operations in what was considered a 21st century “arms race.” While Google described its role as “non-offensive,” the memo argued that involvement in Project Maven might hurt its reputation and ability to attract talent at a time when public trust in technology was waning. The case puts students in the shoes of a recent hire faced with the choice of signing the memo. It also invites them to consider how they would respond, as CEO, to such a petition against one of the company’s contracts.

Pedagogical Objectives:
The purpose of the case is not necessarily to debate the merits of collaboration between private and public sector. Rather, it asks students to reflect on their opportunities and obligations as citizens and leaders of companies and society when pursuing innovation. As companies increasingly attract talent with the promise of work that has personal meaning and allow individuals to make a positive difference in the world, nothing is “just business.” This trend brings to the surface ethical and practical dilemmas at the social, organizational, and personal level. The case offers an opportunity to explore all three levels, touching on the relationship between business and government, the responsibility of a global organization and its leaders, and the expression, encouragement, and management of debate and dissent.

Keywords:
Responsible Leadership, Ethics, Artificial Intelligence, Digital Disruption, Google, Project Maven, Drones, Public Private Partnership, Corporate Social Responsibility, Ethical Dilemma, Sundar Pichai, Us Department of Defense, Don’t Be Evil, Larry Page

Prizes won:
- Winner 2018 EFMD Case Writing Competition, Responsible Leadership

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published: 27 Jun 2018

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Abstract:
The case discusses the globalization of fashion and the trajectory of Fashion Forward Dubai. Since its inception in 2013, FFWD had striven to offer an alternative to traditional fashion weeks by showcasing collections of local designers to fashion buyers, journalists and customers on the catwalk and on internet. Over 15,000 attendees came to the show and more than 100,000 followed it online. In 2018, FFWD’s co-founder, Ramzi Nakad, has to decide whether to continue the B2B+B2C event showcasing emerging brands in Dubai Design District, or create a digital fashion platform to sell direct-to-customers and give brands instant international exposure and access to e-commerce without the high costs of runway shows. The case asks to what extent the global fashion industry is ripe for digital disruption.

Pedagogical Objectives:
Discuss the challenges and opportunities for the emergence and development of a new fashion cluster in Dubai, using digital as a enabler, seen from the perspective of the global strategy options of an entrepreneurial firm based out of Dubai.

Keywords:
Fashion, Digital Disruption, Clusters, Emerging Markets, Dubai, Digital Transformation, Digital Platform, Global Strategy, International Management, Entrepreneurship

Prizes won:
- Winner 2018 EFMD Case Writing Competition, MENA Business Cases

published: 28 May 2018

  • Topic: Responsibility
  • Industry: Technology
  • Region: North America

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Abstract:
In April 2018, after it became known that Google was collaborating with the US Department of Defense on Project Maven, over 3,000 employees signed an internal memo asking CEO Sundar Pichai to (a) cancel the project immediately, and (b) enforce a policy stating that the company would never build warfare technology. Project Maven had been launched in early 2017 as part of the DoD’s efforts to integrate AI and machine learning into its defense strategies. Drones, robots and AI were increasingly deployed in intelligence gathering and combat operations in what was considered a 21stcentury “arms race.” While Google described its role as “non-offensive,” the memo argued that involvement in Project Maven might hurt its reputation and ability to attract talent at a time when public trust in technology was waning. The (A) case puts students in the shoes of a recent hire faced with the choice of signing the memo. It also invites them to consider how they would respond, as CEO, to such a petition against one of the company’s contracts. After outlining what happened in the weeks after the internal controversy was made public, the (B) case raises the question of whether Google had “done the right thing” (its new motto) in discontinuing the project.

Pedagogical Objectives:
The Google and Project Maven case series can be used with MBA and executive audiences in modules on Responsible Leadership, Ethics, and Innovation. The purpose of the case is not necessarily to debate the merits of collaborations between private and public sector, including the military, which are widespread. It aims instead to help students reflect on their roles as citizens and leaders of companies and society—on the opportunities and obligations that come with both, especially when pursuing innovation. More and more companies attract talent with the promise of work that will give them personal meaning and allow them to make a positive difference in the world. Once they do, nothing is “just business”. This brings to the surface ethical and practical dilemmas at the social, organizational, and personal level. The case offers an opportunity to explore all three levels, touching on themes related to the relationship between business and government, the responsibilities of a global organization and its leaders, and the expression, encouragement and management of debate and dissent.

Keywords:
Responsible Leadership, Ethics, Artificial Intelligence, Digital Disruption, Google, Project Maven, Drones, Public Private Partnership, Corporate Social Responsibility, Ethical Dilemma, Sundar Pichai, Us Department of Defense, Don’t Be Evil, Larry Page

Prizes won:
- Winner 2018 EFMD Case Writing Competition, Responsible Leadership

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published: 28 Aug 2017

  • Topic: Responsibility
  • Industry: Financial Services, Venture Capital, Private Equity
  • Region: Asia

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Abstract:
This case describes how an intrapreneur helped Credit Suisse launch a commercially viable impact investing business in Asia. It specifically details the investment strategy and process for a new impact fund aligning social impact objectives with commercial goals of the bank. It also presents two new investment opportunities needing evaluation.

Pedagogical Objectives:
This case is perfect for teaching about impact investing, sustainable investing or responsible finance. It can also be used more generally for topics related to social impact or base of the pyramid in emerging markets – for example, as part of a course on economic development, entrepreneurship, strategy, social entrepreneurship, private equity or venture capital.

Keywords:
Impact Investing, Social Impact, Sustainable Investing, Private Equity, Venture Capital, Sustainability, Base of the Pyramid, Emerging Market Strategy, Creating Shared Value, Responsible Investing, Economic Development, Social Entrepreneurship, Financial Inclusion, Intrapreneurship

Prizes won:
- Winner 2018 EFMD Case Writing Competition

published: 29 May 2017

  • Topic: Responsibility
  • Industry: Public transportation/Taxi
  • Region: Global

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Abstract:
This case explores the changes wrought by the “sharing economy”, examining the innovations and controversies surrounding the online ride-hailing service Uber. It provides a unique overview of the challenges posed by new business models like Uber’s, which use the internet to link individual providers of goods and services to customers. Raising significant economic, social and environmental sustainability issues, it asks: what are the responsibilities of “sharing economy” companies? More specifically, are they merely “technological platforms” facilitating transactions for private individuals or do they have the same responsibilities as real-world companies such as transportation businesses, hotels and employment agencies?

Pedagogical Objectives:
1. To explore the societal changes brought about by the “sharing economy” model and examine the role of corporate social responsibility and sustainability in developing that new economy. 2. To examine the difficulty of defining the “sharing economy” and explore how various possible definitions influence such companies’ responsibilities and how they are regulated. 3. To facilitate discussion of issues such as labour relations and regulatory oversight of companies created by emerging technologies. 4. To explore the potential for greater sustainability through the adoption of “sharing economy” business models. 5. To encourage discussion of positive and negative strategies that technology companies can use to engage with regulators when introducing new platforms and business models.

Keywords:
Sharing Economy, Sustainability, Corporate Social Responsibility, Digital Economy, Digital Disruption, New Business Models, Labour Rights, Consumer Safety, Business Regulation, Taxi Companies, Corporate Governance, Investors, Stakeholders and Accountability

Prizes won:
- Winner of the 2019 Case Centre Awards, Ethics and Social Responsibility Category
- 2018 Case Centre Best-selling Case in Ethics and Social Responsibility
- Second Prize in the Corporate Sustainability track of oikos Case Writing Competition 2017

published: 26 Aug 2016

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Abstract:
Read a related Knowledge article "Lessons in Digital Transformation from the Hotel Industry" by David Dubois.

The case focuses on AccorHotels’ ambitious digital transformation, aiming to put the customer back at the center of its strategy and operations. Responding to a powerful wave of digital disruptions in the hospitality ecosystem, from the emergence of review websites, online travel agents and active forums to the rise of new competitors such as Airbnb, the transformation entailed: (1) designing and implementing an innovative content marketing strategy (including online content creation or co-creation, curation and dissemination) (2) incorporating e-reputation as a core business objective, and (3) creating and/or adapting organizational structures – from management to operations – to support this new dynamic and maximize value creation.
The case starts in Fall 2015, when Olivier Arnoux, SVP Customer Satisfaction at AccorHotels, and his team, are asked to devise an ambitious plan to address the new challenges facing major players in the hotel industry brought about by digital disruptions. It follows the decision-making process step by step, from (1) understanding the nature and impact of online content in the customer journey, to (2) building a strategic plan to integrate online insights into AccorHotels’ core business objectives (in particular the importance of e-reputation), (3) redefining where and how value is created, and creating incentive structures aligned with the new objectives. Participants have multiple opportunities to put themselves in the shoes of the protagonists so as to understand the logic behind the decisions taken.
What is novel is the systematic articulation of how digital and social media impact the customer journey, as well as the integration of online content into marketing strategy (i.e., content marketing) and organizational design (i.e., team structure, incentive system), underlining how embracing the digital revolution entails breaking traditional silos between functions such as marketing, strategy, finance and human resources.
Detailed information on the consumer, the ecosystem, the firm, marketing and financial indicators is provided. Teaching notes and accompanying PowerPoint presentations suggest appropriate classroom exercises and include supplemental material and databases for group exercises. Videos provide insight on what drove the digital transformation and vividly illustrate its implementation and initial impressive results. They include interviews with Emilie Couton (Vice President Digital Marketing Asia Pacific), a video-recorded session of Olivier Arnoux on the digital transformation at AccorHotels, as well as examples of content created or co-created by AccorHotels.

Pedagogical Objectives:
This case offers a forum to discuss what it means for a company to engage its digital transformation in order to foster customer-centricity. A discussion of the nature and role of online content in shifting consumer behavior in the hoteling industry serves as a basis to explore how companies can create value at different points of the customer journey and what these steps entail. The case also touches on a variety of important strategic, organizational and operational decisions that the company must undertake to fully leverage online content and can be used to address the following broad questions (Specific questions are available in the teaching note): 1) How does online content stemming from digital and social media create value in the hoteling industry? 2) How can a company actively manage online content and implement a content strategy? and 3) What aspects of its organizational design a company need to remodel in order to maximize value creation through digital and social media.

Keywords:
Digital Transformation, Content Marketing, Customer Centricity, Hoteling & Tourism, Social Media Marketing, Customer Journey, Consumer Experiences, Digital Disruptions e-Reputation, Reputation Management, Accorhotels Booking Airbnb, Tripadvisor, Online Reviews, Social Media Listening, Digital Organizational Integration, Corporate Governance, Value Creation, Strategy and Implementation

Prizes won:
- 2018 Case Centre Best-selling Case in Marketing
- 2018 Case Awards Winner, Marketing Category, Case Centre
- 2017 Case Centre Best-selling Case in Marketing
- 2017 AFM-CCMP Award for the Best case study in Marketing, Finalist

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