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Award Winning & Best Selling Cases

Did you know that INSEAD wrote 6 of the 10 best-selling cases distributed by the Case Centre in the past 40 years? That INSEAD cases were the Overall Winner of 5 of the last 10 Case Centre Global Case Awards? And that INSEAD cases are used in more than 100 business schools and universities around the world?

179 case studies

by Publication Date
published: 25 Apr 2019

  • Topic: Responsibility
  • Region: Asia

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Abstract:
In 2013, India passed a law to make corporate social responsibility mandatory for large companies. The case examines the context in which the CSR legislation was introduced and how Tata Motors Ltd (TML) responded to it. Case (A) explores the meaning of corporate social responsibility and the question of whether a company should put community projects before profits. Case (B) examines Tata Motors’ CSR programmes in depth and provides an opportunity to consider their impact. Students are challenged to come up with their own ideas for how the philosophy of “more from less for more” can be used to address issues related to poverty and lack of education in India.

Pedagogical Objectives:
1. Explore the meaning and practice of corporate social responsibility and the normative (moral) and instrumental (business case) motivations for companies to engage in it as a voluntary activity. 2. Understand why the Indian government mandated CSR (by the Companies Act 2013) and its implications for companies and their stakeholders, in response to pressing social needs. 3. Consider the impact of CSR programmes, how it can be increased, and ways it can be measured using a Social Return on Investment methodology. 4. Explore the benefits of board involvement in CSR policy-making and reporting. 5. Encourage students to come up with their own ideas about how to do “more from less for more” in India and elsewhere.

Keywords:
Corporate Social Responsibility, India, Government Regulation, Csr Mandate, Social Return on Investment, Corporate Governance, Poverty, Skills Training, Motor Industry, Board of Directors, Kpmg

Prizes won:
- Winner 2018 EFMD Case Writing Competition

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published: 25 Apr 2019

  • Topic: Responsibility
  • Region: Asia

Show details ...

Abstract:
In 2013, India passed a law to make corporate social responsibility mandatory for large companies. The case examines the context in which the CSR legislation was introduced and how Tata Motors Ltd (TML) responded to it. Case (A) explores the meaning of corporate social responsibility and the question of whether a company should put community projects before profits. Case (B) examines Tata Motors’ CSR programmes in depth and provides an opportunity to consider their impact. Students are challenged to come up with their own ideas for how the philosophy of “more from less for more” can be used to address issues related to poverty and lack of education in India.

Pedagogical Objectives:
1. Explore the meaning and practice of corporate social responsibility and the normative (moral) and instrumental (business case) motivations for companies to engage in it as a voluntary activity. 2. Understand why the Indian government mandated CSR (by the Companies Act 2013) and its implications for companies and their stakeholders, in response to pressing social needs. 3. Consider the impact of CSR programmes, how it can be increased, and ways it can be measured using a Social Return on Investment methodology. 4. Explore the benefits of board involvement in CSR policy-making and reporting. 5. Encourage students to come up with their own ideas about how to do “more from less for more” in India and elsewhere.

Keywords:
Corporate Social Responsibility, India, Government Regulation, Csr Mandate, Social Return on Investment, Corporate Governance, Poverty, Skills Training, Motor Industry, Board of Directors, Kpmg

Prizes won:
- Winner 2018 EFMD Case Writing Competition

Related:

published: 31 Aug 2018

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Abstract:
Serial social entrepreneur Andreas Souvaliotis is looking at new ways to achieve his lifelong mission: to improve the health and wellness of his Canadian compatriots. His previous venture, Green Rewards, demonstrated the power of loyalty rewards to promote environmentally-conscious purchases. Andreas is now looking to impact non-commercial habits like walking more, eating less, as well as education. The health and wellness market is growing but hyper competitive, with more than 150,000 apps available on Google Play or on the App Store. B2B or B2C? Fitness, nutrition or mindfulness? Fee, freemium or free? Stand-alone or in collaboration? These are the key questions students must address to help Andreas and his team achieve their goal - and make a profit.
Please visit the dedicated case website to access supplementary material.

Pedagogical Objectives:
This decision-oriented case examines the health and wellness market and, more generally, the topic of behavior modification. Thanks to close collaboration with Carrot Insight, detailed information about what the team did and why, as well as their future plans, is provided through video interviews available on the case website and in the teaching note.

Keywords:
Food, Marketing, Nutrition, Health, Exercising, Fitness, Loyalty, Government, Incentive, Responsibility, Mobile Commerce, Habits, Branding, Regulation

Prizes won:
- Winner 2018 EFMD Case Writing Competition

published: 30 Jul 2018

  • Topic: Responsibility
  • Industry: Technology
  • Region: North America

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Abstract:
In April 2018, after it became known that Google was collaborating with the US Department of Defense on Project Maven, over 3,000 employees signed an internal memo asking CEO Sundar Pichai to (a) cancel the project immediately, and (b) enforce a policy stating that the company would never build warfare technology. Project Maven had been launched in early 2017 as part of the DoD’s efforts to integrate AI and machine learning into its defense strategies. Drones, robots and AI were increasingly deployed in intelligence gathering and combat operations in what was considered a 21st century “arms race.” While Google described its role as “non-offensive,” the memo argued that involvement in Project Maven might hurt its reputation and ability to attract talent at a time when public trust in technology was waning. The case puts students in the shoes of a recent hire faced with the choice of signing the memo. It also invites them to consider how they would respond, as CEO, to such a petition against one of the company’s contracts.

Pedagogical Objectives:
The purpose of the case is not necessarily to debate the merits of collaboration between private and public sector. Rather, it asks students to reflect on their opportunities and obligations as citizens and leaders of companies and society when pursuing innovation. As companies increasingly attract talent with the promise of work that has personal meaning and allow individuals to make a positive difference in the world, nothing is “just business.” This trend brings to the surface ethical and practical dilemmas at the social, organizational, and personal level. The case offers an opportunity to explore all three levels, touching on the relationship between business and government, the responsibility of a global organization and its leaders, and the expression, encouragement, and management of debate and dissent.

Keywords:
Responsible Leadership, Ethics, Artificial Intelligence, Digital Disruption, Google, Project Maven, Drones, Public Private Partnership, Corporate Social Responsibility, Ethical Dilemma, Sundar Pichai, Us Department of Defense, Don’t Be Evil, Larry Page

Prizes won:
- Winner 2018 EFMD Case Writing Competition, Responsible Leadership

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published: 27 Jun 2018

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Abstract:
The case discusses the globalization of fashion and the trajectory of Fashion Forward Dubai. Since its inception in 2013, FFWD had striven to offer an alternative to traditional fashion weeks by showcasing collections of local designers to fashion buyers, journalists and customers on the catwalk and on internet. Over 15,000 attendees came to the show and more than 100,000 followed it online. In 2018, FFWD’s co-founder, Ramzi Nakad, has to decide whether to continue the B2B+B2C event showcasing emerging brands in Dubai Design District, or create a digital fashion platform to sell direct-to-customers and give brands instant international exposure and access to e-commerce without the high costs of runway shows. The case asks to what extent the global fashion industry is ripe for digital disruption.

Pedagogical Objectives:
Discuss the challenges and opportunities for the emergence and development of a new fashion cluster in Dubai, using digital as a enabler, seen from the perspective of the global strategy options of an entrepreneurial firm based out of Dubai.

Keywords:
Fashion, Digital Disruption, Clusters, Emerging Markets, Dubai, Digital Transformation, Digital Platform, Global Strategy, International Management, Entrepreneurship

Prizes won:
- Winner 2018 EFMD Case Writing Competition, MENA Business Cases

published: 06 Jun 2018

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Abstract:
Chocolate candy marketers like Mars, Nestlé, Hershey and Ferrero are under pressure to respond to the stricter nutritional targets set by governments, changing consumer tastes, and competition from healthier brands like Kind or Cliff. Should traditional chocolate makers reformulate their products with less sugar content (and if so, should they announce it)? Should they reduce portion or package sizes (and if so, should they reduce prices)? More generally, is obesity their responsibility? Is collaboration with competitors, researchers and advocacy groups the solution? How can they grow their business without contributing to the obesity epidemic?
Please visit the dedicated case website to access supplementary material.

Pedagogical Objectives:
This case examines whether food marketing can be a force for good in helping to align business with consumer health and pleasure. It addresses key issues such as how to manage food claims (and perceptions) and downsizing in a category disrupted by start-ups like Kind. A comprehensive teaching note and detailed PowerPoint presentation divulge the latest research findings in this domain – e.g., on the causes and consequences of obesity, health halos, perceptions of portion size, and ‘epicurean nudging’ (or how focusing on pleasure, not health, can make people happier to spend more on food yet eat less).

Keywords:
Food, Marketing, Nutrition, Health, Packaging, Portion Size, Chocolate, Innovation, Retailing, Responsibility, Sustainability, Ethics, Branding, Regulation

Prizes won:
- Third Prize in the Corporate Sustainability track of oikos Case Writing Competition 2018

published: 28 May 2018

  • Topic: Responsibility
  • Industry: Automotive
  • Region: Global

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Abstract:
The case is a detailed ‘inside’ account of the ‘dieselgate’ scandal at Volkswagen which revealed how engineers had programmed software that enabled its cars to cheat emissions tests. It explores the origins of internal and external forces that propelled the company to market environmentally sustainable “clean diesel” cars while using engine management software to conceal on-the-road emissions of over 40 times the permitted levels. The scandal - one of the biggest of the decade – illustrates contributing factors that are common to many instances of organizational misconduct: obedience to authority, organizational culture, goal-setting, and corporate governance.

Pedagogical Objectives:
1. To understand how ethical and social responsibility issues arise in business at the level of the individual, the organization, and society. 2. To identify and analyse the individual and organizational factors that give rise to organizational misconduct. 3. To consider how such factors can be mitigated, and the implications for responsible business leadership, organizational design, and corporate governance. 4. To discuss corporate hypocrisy – how an organization with a reputation for engineering excellence could market “clean diesel” cars and programme them to cheat emissions tests. 5. To explore the industry and societal consequences of organizational misconduct by a major player in the automotive industry. 6. To consider the role of rationalisations in justifying misconduct by individuals. 7. To apply the fraud triangle framework to explore risks of organizational misconduct. 8. To discuss effective crisis-management responses.

Keywords:
Environmental Responsibility, Organizational Misconduct, Vehicle Emissions, Sustainability, Corporate Social Responsibility, Business Ethics, Organizational Culture, Leadership, Green Marketing, Volkswagen, Automotive Industry, Pollution, Fraud Triangle, Crisis Management

Prizes won:
- Second Prize in the Corporate Sustainability track of oikos Case Writing Competition 2018

published: 28 May 2018

  • Topic: Responsibility
  • Industry: Technology
  • Region: North America

Show details ...

Abstract:
In April 2018, after it became known that Google was collaborating with the US Department of Defense on Project Maven, over 3,000 employees signed an internal memo asking CEO Sundar Pichai to (a) cancel the project immediately, and (b) enforce a policy stating that the company would never build warfare technology. Project Maven had been launched in early 2017 as part of the DoD’s efforts to integrate AI and machine learning into its defense strategies. Drones, robots and AI were increasingly deployed in intelligence gathering and combat operations in what was considered a 21stcentury “arms race.” While Google described its role as “non-offensive,” the memo argued that involvement in Project Maven might hurt its reputation and ability to attract talent at a time when public trust in technology was waning. The (A) case puts students in the shoes of a recent hire faced with the choice of signing the memo. It also invites them to consider how they would respond, as CEO, to such a petition against one of the company’s contracts. After outlining what happened in the weeks after the internal controversy was made public, the (B) case raises the question of whether Google had “done the right thing” (its new motto) in discontinuing the project.

Pedagogical Objectives:
The Google and Project Maven case series can be used with MBA and executive audiences in modules on Responsible Leadership, Ethics, and Innovation. The purpose of the case is not necessarily to debate the merits of collaborations between private and public sector, including the military, which are widespread. It aims instead to help students reflect on their roles as citizens and leaders of companies and society—on the opportunities and obligations that come with both, especially when pursuing innovation. More and more companies attract talent with the promise of work that will give them personal meaning and allow them to make a positive difference in the world. Once they do, nothing is “just business”. This brings to the surface ethical and practical dilemmas at the social, organizational, and personal level. The case offers an opportunity to explore all three levels, touching on themes related to the relationship between business and government, the responsibilities of a global organization and its leaders, and the expression, encouragement and management of debate and dissent.

Keywords:
Responsible Leadership, Ethics, Artificial Intelligence, Digital Disruption, Google, Project Maven, Drones, Public Private Partnership, Corporate Social Responsibility, Ethical Dilemma, Sundar Pichai, Us Department of Defense, Don’t Be Evil, Larry Page

Prizes won:
- Winner 2018 EFMD Case Writing Competition, Responsible Leadership

Related:

published: 11 Oct 2017

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Abstract:
In 2017, the Financial Times ranked INSEAD’s MBA programme #1 in the world for the second year in a row. The Dean of INSEAD, Ilian Mihov, commissioned a large-scale study to understand the shool’s brand equity compared to its peers. The goal is to optimize INSEAD’s positioning, value proposition and communication, to attract the best MBA students. Case A asks students to develop a survey that will measure the strengths and weaknesses of the INSEAD brand compared to its key competitors. They must select the performance measures, relevant competitors and the relevant sample. Case B provides results from a survey of 4,000 GMAT-takers who rated 18 business schools. Students analyze the data to measure the strength of the INSEAD brand and its image compared with its competitors. To optimize the school’s positioning, students must identify the most important attributes used when choosing an MBA programme.
Please visit the dedicated case website to access supplementary material.

Pedagogical Objectives:
This case can be used for many different audiences and contexts. It can be used for discussion in MBA, undergraduate, or executive education courses focusing on branding, brand metrics, marketing research, customer intelligence, data analytics, customer centricity, general marketing strategy, communication and social media strategy, consumer behavior, and international marketing.

Keywords:
Business Schools, Strategic Market Intelligence, Brand Management, Brand Equity Analysis, Brand Metrics, Marketing Research, Data Analytics, Multivariate Analyses, Research Design, Insead, Mba Programme

Prizes won:
- Best Case Study Award by AFM/CCMP 2018

Related:

published: 11 Oct 2017

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Abstract:
In 2017, the Financial Times ranked INSEAD’s MBA programme #1 in the world for the second year in a row. The Dean of INSEAD, Ilian Mihov, commissioned a large-scale study to understand the shool’s brand equity compared to its peers. The goal is to optimize INSEAD’s positioning, value proposition and communication, to attract the best MBA students. Case A asks students to develop a survey that will measure the strengths and weaknesses of the INSEAD brand compared to its key competitors. They must select the performance measures, relevant competitors and the relevant sample. Case B provides results from a survey of 4,000 GMAT-takers who rated 18 business schools. Students analyze the data to measure the strength of the INSEAD brand and its image compared with its competitors. To optimize the school’s positioning, students must identify the most important attributes used when choosing an MBA programme.
Please visit the dedicated case website to access supplementary material.

Pedagogical Objectives:
This case can be used for many different audiences and contexts. It can be used for discussion in MBA, undergraduate, or executive education courses focusing on branding, brand metrics, marketing research, customer intelligence, data analytics, customer centricity, general marketing strategy, communication and social media strategy, consumer behavior, and international marketing.

Keywords:
Business Schools, Strategic Market Intelligence, Brand Management, Brand Equity Analysis, Brand Metrics, Marketing Research, Data Analytics, Multivariate Analyses, Research Design, Insead, Mba Programme

Prizes won:
- Prix de la Meilleure Etude de Cas par AFM/CCMP - Best Case Study Award by AFM/CCMP

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