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Latest Case Studies

75 case studies

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published: 12 Nov 2019

  • Topic: Entrepreneurship
  • Region: Middle-East

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Abstract:
In 2012, when Careem first started operations in Dubai as a private limousine booking business, it was a tiny start-up working with just US$100,000 of its founders’ savings. Selim Turki is hired (its 18th employee) to develop and market its platform as a ‘white label’ solution for companies’ transport arrangements. The intention is to boost the supply of cars/drivers in Carem’s network, but it does not kindle the interest expected from local companies and proves to be a drain on resources at a time when the main business is challenged by global rivals like Uber. The company has to decide how to allocate its limited resources to compete successfully.

Pedagogical Objectives:
The case highlights the issues of resource allocation decisions in a start-up and the need for agility in fast-changing conditions against a backdrop of digital disruption by new technologies and the entry of global competitors. It prompts discussion of the following themes/questions: 1. Strategy: Does distance still matter in digital business? The issue of business model adaptation – from emerging markets to developed/highly competitive markets. 2. Entrepreneurship: Where to allocate scarce technical and capital resources in a fast-growing tech enterprise? 3. OB/leadership: How to manage/lead products/services and internal/external stakeholders

Keywords:
Ride-Hailing, Uber, Middle East, Platform, Strategic Agility, Start-Up, Minimum Viable Product, White Label Solution, Resource Allocation

published: 12 Nov 2019

  • Topic: Responsibility
  • Region: Europe

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Abstract:
The case describes how the Italian multinational Enel Group, one of the largest power utilities companies in the world, embraced the transformation of the energy sector, combining open innovation with sustainability – or what the company calls “Innovability”). CEO Francesco Starace believes that technology and business model innovation are the key to reducing CO2 emissions and creating a more sustainable future by boosting renewable energy production. From 2014, he makes innovation and sustainability his strategic pillars, embracing the notion of ‘open innovation’ – harvesting ideas externally (rather than just in-house) from an ecosystem of start-ups, SMEs, universities, researchers, suppliers, other corporations, and employees.

Pedagogical Objectives:
Discuss how large multinational corporations can make ‘open innovation’ a global strategy, setting up innovation hubs in different parts of the world and putting sustainability at the core of the organization.

Keywords:
Energy, Innovation, Sustainability, Renewable Energy, Sdgs, Digital Transformation, Fourth Industrial Revolution, Business Model Innovation, Open Innovation

published: 12 Nov 2019

  • Topic: Strategy
  • Region: Global

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Abstract:
The case describes how three INSEAD alumni founded fintech company Prodigy Finance and created the market for international student loans by solving a problem long overlooked by the finance industry: funding for students in pursuit of advanced education outside their home country, especially “high-earning degree programmes” at top universities with high tuition fees and few scholarships. Traditional banks had ignored this burning need and stayed focused purely on domestic borrowers and local credit records. The founders of Prodigy Finance took a radically different approach, creating a lending platform based on a forward-looking, cross-border risk assessment model and connecting international student borrowers with individual and institutional investors. By 2019, Prodigy Finance had helped over 11,200 students from 132 countries, lending more than US$538 million. This strategic move offers an illustration of “nondisruptive market creation”, a concept coined by W. Chan Kim and Renée Mauborgne, authors of the bestselling Blue Ocean Strategy and Blue Ocean Shift. By identifying and solving a problem that had never been addressed, Prodigy Finance created a new market beyond existing industry boundaries, unlocking and capturing burgeoning new demand without displacing or competing with what the financial services sector had to offer.

Pedagogical Objectives:
This case is intended for use in MBA and executive classrooms, with the following objectives: 1) To illustrate nondisruptive creation and the major advantages of this market-creating method. 2) Use the case as a context to take students through the major steps of identifying potential opportunities for nondisruptive creation. 3) Demonstrate how to use new technologies, new platforms and new business models to achieve nondisruptive market creation.

Keywords:
Fintech, Loan Industry, Student Loans, Bond, Community Investment, Debt Financing, Credit Risk Assessment, Social Good, Social Impact, Disruption, Nondisruption, Nondisruptive Creation, Nondisruptive Innovation

published: 12 Nov 2019

  • Topic: Responsibility
  • Region: Global

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Abstract:
Jacqueline Novogratz quits a prestigious banking job to pursue a career in development but discovers that achieving real impact is harder than she had imagined, especially as grant-funded non-profits often lack the skills and accountability to be really effective. After getting an MBA and some experience with the Rockefeller Foundation, she starts work on setting up an impact investing fund called Acumen, with a mission to finance and support social enterprises that serve the world’s poor through market-based solutions.

Pedagogical Objectives:
This short case is suited for modules related to purposeful leadership, meaningful careers, nonprofit management, effective philanthropy, financial inclusion, impact-driven business, base-of-the-pyramid, social enterpreneurship and impact investing. It provides a basis to discuss why – in the absence of mechanisms to ensure accountability – the effectiveness of organisations in the social sector may be limited. It shows how combining an intention to make a positive impact with the discipline of a market-based approach can lead to more sustainable, scalable solutions to pressing societal needs.

Keywords:
Purposeful Careers, Social Impact, Venture Philanthropy, Base of the Pyramid (bop), Impact Investing, Business Model Innovation, Social Enterprise, Nonprofit Management, Inclusive Business, Impact Evaluation, Financial Inclusion, Social Entrepreneurship, Sustainable Development

published: 12 Nov 2019

  • Topic: Leadership & Organisations
  • Region: Asia

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Abstract:
An INSEAD alumnus is asked to lead a digital transformation effort in a large commercial bank. S/he designs the project, sources an entrepreneurial partner to provide the software platform, and runs a highly successful pilot test that saves millions of euros. Yet rolling out the new system to the rest of the organization proves to be almost impossible. Why, and what should s/he do next?

Pedagogical Objectives:
. Examine the change implications of a significant digital disruption project. . Explore the process of chartering and executing a digital transformation project. . Demonstrate the use of agile methods in a cross-functional digital transformation project. . Understand why successful transformative projects must be designed from their inception with scaling up in mind.

Keywords:
Digital, Digital Transformation, Financial Services, Change Management, Leadership, Agile Methodology, Cross-Functional Projects, Working with Entrepreneurs

published: 30 Sep 2019

  • Topic: Strategy
  • Region: Asia

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Abstract:
Preferred Networks, Inc. (PFN), a start-up specialized in deep learning technologies, a branch of artificial intelligence (AI) research, differentiated itself early on by aligning with Japan’s manufacturing might and bringing deep learning to the internet of things (IoT). The case follows the start-up as it evolves into a highly valued company with over 200 employees and global partners across various industries. It offers an overview of the AI business landscape and an explanation of deep learning. PFN’s trajectory shows how technology-heavy research firms spark innovation, attract business partners and collaborators, manage as they grow, and decide what business model best suits their needs. The case is intended for use in classes on artificial intelligence, technology and operations management, marketing of complex products and technologies, entrepreneurship and strategic partnerships for research-heavy startups.

Pedagogical Objectives:
The purpose is to learn how to build a business around new and emerging technologies such as deep learning and other advanced machine learning methods. In addition, it can be used to study • Alliances and partnerships between tech-oriented startups and large organizations interested in the technology; • The marketing of new and complex technologies without a marketing team; • Team management and recruitment in an organization with abundant technical talent but limited business experience; • How deep learning and other machine learning methods can be applied to industries such as autonomous driving, factory automation, and healthcare. Key takeaways: • Understand the meaning of “artificial neural network”, “machine learning”, “artificial intelligence”, “shallow” vs. “deep learning” and their role in the AI boom; • An overview of the AI industry and its growing importance across various sectors; • (as seen through the lens of PFN) Specific applications of deep neural networks in autonomous driving, factory automation, and healthcare; • Assess different business models for technology and research-heavy start-ups (in this case integrator/partnerships, profit shares and new product development).

Keywords:
Artificial Intelligence, Deep Learning, Artificial Neural Networks, Startups, Research and Development, Marketing of New Technologies, Autonomous Driving, Factory Automation, Predictive Diagnostics, Biomedical Technology, Computer Vision, Competitive Strategy

published: 30 Sep 2019

  • Topic: Economics & Finance
  • Industry: Alcoholic Beverages
  • Region: Asia

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Abstract:
The case outlines the investment details regarding Gem India Advisors equity investment in Sula Wines. After winning a 19% marketshare in the Indian Wine market in less than four years, Sula Wines is looking for additional investment to expand its business. The case descibes the opportunities, risks and assumptions associated with the investment.

Pedagogical Objectives:
The case is designed to walk students through the valuation and deal structure of a growth capital investment, using the Sula Wines example. Key topics covered are valuation using DCF and comparables, deal structure, assumptions and post-investment growth initiatives.

Keywords:
Wines, Alcoholic Beverages, Venture Capital, India, Private Equity, Adec, Gpei, Gpei-Case

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published: 30 Sep 2019

  • Topic: Economics & Finance
  • Industry: Alcoholic Beverages
  • Region: Asia

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Abstract:
The case outlines the investment details regarding Gem India Advisors equity investment in Sula Wines. After winning a 19% marketshare in the Indian Wine market in less than four years, Sula Wines is looking for additional investment to expand its business. The case descibes the opportunities, risks and assumptions associated with the investment.

Pedagogical Objectives:
The case is designed to walk students through the valuation and deal structure of a growth capital investment, using the Sula Wines example. Key topics covered are valuation using DCF and comparables, deal structure, assumptions and post-investment growth initiatives.

Keywords:
Wines, Alcoholic Beverages, Venture Capital, India, Private Equity, Adec, Gpei, Gpei-Case

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published: 28 Aug 2019

  • Topic: Strategy
  • Region: Asia

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Abstract:
The background notes accompany the free online case “Indian Premier League: Innovation Without Disruption”, a self-paced, interactive case that lets readers analyze the strategic logic behind the launch of Indian Premier League (IPL) using blue ocean analytical tools and frameworks. With visual aids and interactive exercises, the case explores how the IPL transformed traditional days-long cricket matches into a thrilling three-hour sports drama with Bollywood music and cheerleaders, and opened up a new market space - “cricketainment” on the pitch and on primetime TV for families to enjoy. Students and executives come to understand the IPL and cricketainment market as an example of nondisruptive creation, i.e., they did not displace or disrupt the existing sector (players, products or services). They were creative but not destructive of what went before, i.e., the domestic cricket league and other forms of entertainment. Applying Chan Kim and Renée Mauborgne’s three-step process, readers discover how the IPL unlocked a new market that was beneficial to both the domestic cricket league and the entertainment industry.

Pedagogical Objectives:
The teaching objectives of the online case and background notes are: 1) To explore how the Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI) reinvented the way cricket was played and enjoyed; 2) Apply Blue Ocean concepts, tools and frameworks to the BCCI’s strategic move to create the IPL; 3) Understand that innovation and growth can be driven by “nondisruptive creation”; 4) Illustrate that concept/process using the BCCI’s success in creating a new market and exponential growth without displacing or disrupting the existing order.

Keywords:
Blue Ocean Strategy, Blue Ocean Shift, Indian Premier League, Value Innovation, Sport, Cricket, India, Bollywood, Ipl, Nondisruptive Creation, Sports Business, Public Private Partnership, Disruption, Entertainment

published: 26 Jul 2019

  • Topic: Responsibility
  • Region: Africa

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Abstract:
This case puts participants in the shoes of the directors of Barry Callebaut (BC), a cocoa-sourcing and chocolate manufacturing company. Chairman Andreas Jacobs is passionate about cocoa sustainability in West Africa – ensuring the cocoa crop (endangered by poor farming and climate change) and the farmers who grow it will survive and thrive. However, in response to a falling share price, the BC board has shifted strategy to achieve cost leadership. Moreover, customers have been unwilling to pay a premium for sustainable cocoa beans. Given the scale of the problem, the company cannot ‘go it alone’. Nonetheless, when the CEO steps down in 2008, Jacobs sees an opportunity for BC to embrace sustainability and urges the board to go beyond goodwill gestures – like its earlier building of schools in Ivory Coast – and take “real action”. Should the board follow his lead? What would “real action” mean?

Pedagogical Objectives:
1. How business should be involved in sustainability and the challenges involved in taking real, impactful action (not simply paying lip-service). 2. Consider sustainability challenges in the context of business challenges – seen through the eyes of the board – and the role of the board in driving sustainability initiatives. 3. Evaluate the extent to which board members should follow the lead of a strong chairman pursuing a personal passion. 4. Identify solutions to the sustainability challenges faced by Barry Callebaut.

Keywords:
Sustainability, Corporate Governance, Boards, Cocoa, Chocolate, Supply Chains, Côte D’ivoire, Africa, Child Labour, Poverty

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