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Family Business

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published: 30 Jul 2018

  • Topic: Family Business
  • Industry: Heating equipment
  • Region: Europe

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Abstract:
Family-owned firm Brunata, an engineering business and major player in Denmark’s heat consumption market, faces a leadership crisis after the retirement of its charismatic founder. Although his four children have worked in the company, none ultimately have the right stuff to lead, notably the eldest son who is removed by his father three years after taking over the top job. The professional manager who is subsequently appointed lasts only two years. The case includes interview material and highlights the emerging role of the board, whose external directors tried to turn the situation around.

Pedagogical Objectives:
The case offers penetrating insight into the issues of succession and professionalization of management at family-owned firms. It provides information for a lively discussion on the role of founders, owner-managers, next gens, professional managers and board members planning for the long term, as well as the distinctive hurdles that such firms face. It can be used for courses on family business, directors, leadership and negotiation.

Keywords:
Family Business, Board of Directors, Brunata, Danish Market, Heat Meters, Owner-Managers, Negotiations, Succession, Next Gens, Ceo, Founders, Sibling Disputes, Professionalization, Denmark

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published: 30 Jul 2018

  • Topic: Family Business
  • Industry: Heating equipment
  • Region: Europe

Show details ...

Abstract:
Family-owned firm Brunata, an engineering business and major player in Denmark’s heat consumption market, faces a leadership crisis after the retirement of its charismatic founder. Although his four children have worked in the company, none ultimately have the right stuff to lead, notably the eldest son who is removed by his father three years after taking over the top job. The professional manager who is subsequently appointed lasts only two years. The case includes interview material and highlights the emerging role of the board, whose external directors tried to turn the situation around.

Pedagogical Objectives:
The case offers penetrating insight into the issues of succession and professionalization of management at family-owned firms. It provides information for a lively discussion on the role of founders, owner-managers, next gens, professional managers and board members planning for the long term, as well as the distinctive hurdles that such firms face. It can be used for courses on family business, directors, leadership and negotiation.

Keywords:
Family Business, Board of Directors, Brunata, Danish Market, Heat Meters, Owner-Managers, Negotiations, Succession, Next Gens, Ceo, Founders, Sibling Disputes, Professionalization, Denmark

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published: 28 May 2018

  • Topic: Family Business
  • Region: North America

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Abstract:
This is not your typical family business case and that is what makes it such a rich teaching tool and learning experience. The Paul Newman story covers several family business topics and issues including Fair Process, philanthropy, social ventures, estate and succession planning, governance, next generation roles, entrepreneurship, family communication and relationships, and non-family executives. The sense of fairness is achieved with effective family communication and governance that builds trust to support long-term family commitment. The Newman case demonstrates the difficulty of making ownership, governance and leadership decisions that are effective and perceived as fair by the next generation.

Pedagogical Objectives:
Fair Process is at the core of INSEAD’s work with business families. The sense of fairness is achieved with effective family and business communication and governance that builds trust and supports long-term family commitment. The Newman case deals with the difficulty of making leadership and ownership decisions that are perceived as fair by a business family.

Keywords:
Fair Process, Social Ventures, Planning, Next Generation Leadership, Communication, Non-Family Executives, Estate Planning, Difficult Conversations, Entrepreneurship, Next Generation Commitment, Family Relationships, Next Generation Careers

published: 26 Mar 2018

  • Topic: Family Business
  • Industry: Transportation
  • Region: Asia

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Abstract:
The case highlights a bloodless succession coup that was over within weeks following the death of the founder of one of the largest conglomerates in Taiwan. In January 2016, Chairman Chang Yung-fa, 88, founder of Evergreen Group, died, leaving a handwritten testament disinheriting his three sons from his first deceased wife. All of his assets, plus the position of Chairman, were supposed to go to his only son from his second wife. Did that happen as the founder thought it would? Absolutely not. He had apparently overlooked the majority shareholdings of his first three sons, which made his will not worth the paper it was written on. The three sons voted, with their majority shareholdings, their half-brother out of the family-run business altogether. For one or two weeks, the young man nursed his ejection, literally—he had been CEO of Eva Airways, a key division of the conglomerate, and a respected pilot. But it soon dawned on him that his remaining assets—the modest sum of €1.5 billion—could be used to launch a new airline company in Taiwan. This is where the cases leaves the four Chang brothers. The case brings into sharp relief what can happen when no long-term planning is put in place by even the most respected of founders.

Pedagogical Objectives:
The case focuses the attention of students, execs, family leaders, next gens and all those interested in family business, on the critical importance of long-term planning. One of the biggest challenges facing owner-managers in family firms is the design and implementation of a long-term plan that will ensure the sustainability of their firms for decades to come. To this end, owner-managers will learn to go beyond the day-to-day activities to consider a diverse range of strategic questions that will come up in 10 or 20 years’ time. They will create a transparent system of rules and procedures so that the possible roles of individual family members are communicated well in advance of retirement, health problems or death. Owner-managers who have the courage to confront difficult and emotionally charged issues that arise in family businesses can thus avoid the type of breakup of a family-run business as happened to the Evergreen Group following the death of its founder.

Keywords:
Evergreen Group, Chairman Chang, Eva Airways, Starlux, Chang Yung-Fa Foundation, Yang Ming, Evergreen Line, Family Succession, Taiwanese Conglomerate, Family Business, Chang Yung-Fa, Chang Kuo-Wei, Bronson Hsieh, Transasia Airways

published: 27 Nov 2017

  • Topic: Family Business
  • Industry: Radio, Television, Consumer Electronics
  • Region: Asia

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Abstract:
This three-part case covers the history of Samsung from its origins as a small trucking company to one of Korea’s largest conglomerates. Part A, “Drivers of Success, Family Assets and Business Strategy”, charts the growth of Korea’s the export-led economy after the end of Japanese occupation in 1945, driven by a handful of family-owned ‘chaebols’. Founder Lee Byung-chull’s trucking business, set up in 1938, diversified in the aftermath of the Korean War, as he forged a strong political network that enabled him to embed his family’s influence and assets in the business strategy. Part B, “Heart Attack Puts Succession Planning at Risk”, describes how the ill health of the second-generation leader Lee Kun-hee deprived the firm of a clear succession plan. As the de facto leader of Samsung, his son had to build up his power base to assume the role in the context of a complex ownership structure. Part C, “Court calls time out on Lee Jae-yong”, examines how the de facto heir was convicted of bribery and given a five-year prison sentence, prompting speculation that he would run the Samsung empire from his cell.

Pedagogical Objectives:
The three parts can be used together or as stand-alone cases in the classroom. Part A (16 pages) explores the success of a family business with modest beginnings, transformed within a generation into a major conglomerate; the role of the second-generation leader who transformed the export-driven firm into a global company with factories and R&D facilities all over the world; and the role of family relationships that enabled the Lee clan to retain ownership over the sprawling enterprise. Instructors can use the shorter Part B (11 pages) to look at the Lee family and the choices available to the de facto heir after his father’s heart attack; the tax avoidance measures he must have taken (in view of Korea’s hefty 50% tax on estates of this size); and the much publicized merger of two Samsung affiliates that was clearly not in the interests of minority investors. Part C (10 pages) enables discussion of the legal ramifications of illegal behavior and the possibility of reforming aspects of the family-run chaebols, which critics blame for the state of the economy today.

Keywords:
Samsung, Lee Jae-Yong, Korea, Lee Byung-Chull, Chaebol, Lee Kun-Hee, Lee Boo-Jin, Lee Seo-Hyun, Paul Elliott Singer, Elliot Management, Park Geun-Hye, Park Chung-Hee, Samsung Electronics, Conglomerates

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published: 27 Nov 2017

  • Topic: Family Business
  • Industry: Radio, Television, Consumer Electronics
  • Region: Asia

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Abstract:
This three-part case covers the history of Samsung from its origins as a small trucking company to one of Korea’s largest conglomerates. Part A, “Drivers of Success, Family Assets and Business Strategy”, charts the growth of Korea’s the export-led economy after the end of Japanese occupation in 1945, driven by a handful of family-owned ‘chaebols’. Founder Lee Byung-chull’s trucking business, set up in 1938, diversified in the aftermath of the Korean War, as he forged a strong political network that enabled him to embed his family’s influence and assets in the business strategy. Part B, “Heart Attack Puts Succession Planning at Risk”, describes how the ill health of the second-generation leader Lee Kun-hee deprived the firm of a clear succession plan. As the de facto leader of Samsung, his son had to build up his power base to assume the role in the context of a complex ownership structure. Part C, “Court calls time out on Lee Jae-yong”, examines how the de facto heir was convicted of bribery and given a five-year prison sentence, prompting speculation that he would run the Samsung empire from his cell.

Pedagogical Objectives:
The three parts can be used together or as stand-alone cases in the classroom. Part A (16 pages) explores the success of a family business with modest beginnings, transformed within a generation into a major conglomerate; the role of the second-generation leader who transformed the export-driven firm into a global company with factories and R&D facilities all over the world; and the role of family relationships that enabled the Lee clan to retain ownership over the sprawling enterprise. Instructors can use the shorter Part B (11 pages) to look at the Lee family and the choices available to the de facto heir after his father’s heart attack; the tax avoidance measures he must have taken (in view of Korea’s hefty 50% tax on estates of this size); and the much publicized merger of two Samsung affiliates that was clearly not in the interests of minority investors. Part C (10 pages) enables discussion of the legal ramifications of illegal behavior and the possibility of reforming aspects of the family-run chaebols, which critics blame for the state of the economy today.

Keywords:
Samsung, Lee Jae-Yong, Korea, Lee Byung-Chull, Chaebol, Lee Kun-Hee, Lee Boo-Jin, Lee Seo-Hyun, Paul Elliott Singer, Elliot Management, Park Geun-Hye, Park Chung-Hee, Samsung Electronics, Conglomerates

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published: 27 Nov 2017

  • Topic: Family Business
  • Industry: Radio, Television, Consumer Electronics
  • Region: Asia

Show details ...

Abstract:
This three-part case covers the history of Samsung from its origins as a small trucking company to one of Korea’s largest conglomerates. Part A, “Drivers of Success, Family Assets and Business Strategy”, charts the growth of Korea’s the export-led economy after the end of Japanese occupation in 1945, driven by a handful of family-owned ‘chaebols’. Founder Lee Byung-chull’s trucking business, set up in 1938, diversified in the aftermath of the Korean War, as he forged a strong political network that enabled him to embed his family’s influence and assets in the business strategy. Part B, “Heart Attack Puts Succession Planning at Risk”, describes how the ill health of the second-generation leader Lee Kun-hee deprived the firm of a clear succession plan. As the de facto leader of Samsung, his son had to build up his power base to assume the role in the context of a complex ownership structure. Part C, “Court calls time out on Lee Jae-yong”, examines how the de facto heir was convicted of bribery and given a five-year prison sentence, prompting speculation that he would run the Samsung empire from his cell.

Pedagogical Objectives:
The three parts can be used together or as stand-alone cases in the classroom. Part A (16 pages) explores the success of a family business with modest beginnings, transformed within a generation into a major conglomerate; the role of the second-generation leader who transformed the export-driven firm into a global company with factories and R&D facilities all over the world; and the role of family relationships that enabled the Lee clan to retain ownership over the sprawling enterprise. Instructors can use the shorter Part B (11 pages) to look at the Lee family and the choices available to the de facto heir after his father’s heart attack; the tax avoidance measures he must have taken (in view of Korea’s hefty 50% tax on estates of this size); and the much publicized merger of two Samsung affiliates that was clearly not in the interests of minority investors. Part C (10 pages) enables discussion of the legal ramifications of illegal behavior and the possibility of reforming aspects of the family-run chaebols, which critics blame for the state of the economy today.

Keywords:
Samsung, Lee Jae-Yong, Korea, Lee Byung-Chull, Chaebol, Lee Kun-Hee, Lee Boo-Jin, Lee Seo-Hyun, Paul Elliott Singer, Elliot Management, Park Geun-Hye, Park Chung-Hee, Samsung Electronics, Conglomerates

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published: 25 Sep 2017

  • Topic: Family Business
  • Industry: Household furniture
  • Region: Asia

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Abstract:
The case is about a small family-owned business making fine bone china in South Korea, whose founder was driven by a sense of filial piety, one of the principles of Confucianism. This emphasizes respect for parents, elders and children, and the idea that they will be taken care of in times of need. Exemplary behaviour is expected from children in public in order to reflect well on their family name and ancestors. Fraternity among brothers is also emphasized to prevent disputes arising out of sibling rivalry. The case explores how successive generations kept these values alive within the family, the company, and its employees. It also describes how more recently, Hankook Chinaware has lost significant market share on the domestic front as because of an influx of low-cost Chinese products flooding South Korea.

Pedagogical Objectives:
Instructors can use this case for specific situations in which the principles of Confucianism are being taught. Family business instructors who run courses in Asia-Pacific may find it particularly relevant as it deals with concepts relevant to the region. The case is short and easy to read. From a technical point of view, it can be used to shed light on the transfer of pottery skills from one generation to the next. Instructors can also use it to highlight how external market forces can transform a niche business into a commodity industry where profit margins are squeezed beyond breaking point.

Keywords:
Hankook Chinaware, Confucianism, South Korea, Porcelain, Luxury Chinaware, Dinner Plates, Dinner Plates, Pottery, Filial Piety, Wedgwood, Prouna, Vases, Josiah Wedgwood, Fine Bone China

published: 03 Jul 2017

  • Topic: Family Business
  • Industry: Apparel
  • Region: South America

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Abstract:
A well-known lingerie retailer in Colombia, Leonisa is a family-owned company that barely survived a second-generation succession crisis. Brothers Joaquín and Julio Ernesto Urrea founded the firm in 1956, and over 50 years built one of the most recognizable brands in Latin America. While they each had an equal stake in the company, their respective families were not of equal size: Joaquín had 11 children including nine boys, Julio had three daughters. While the girls were interested in design and fashion, the boys were keen to create satellite ventures around the core brand. When one of the co-founders died, a family dispute erupted over whether the dividends should be plowed back into the business or distributed to the shareholders. A mediator obliged the warring branches to reach a settlement that would allow Leonisa to survive. The ousted sisters eventually had their own success story by launching a new business based on their core competencies.

Pedagogical Objectives:
The case offers an opportunity to learn from a family-run company that survived a succession crisis, requiring students to think about family differences from a shareholder point of view, and the role of mediators in saving warring family branches from destroying the firm. It underlines the need for co-founders whose families have different interests to have a long-term plan to prevent a clash of clans. In this instance, one branch got out of the original business and constructed a new business based on their fashion and design skills. Students of family business in Colombia and Latin America will learn lessons from a family dispute that was ultimately resolved.

Keywords:
Leonisa, Ellipse, Urrea, Women’s Underwear, Lingerie, Colombia, Brassieres, Ana Patricia Urrea, Urrea Jiménez, Urrea Arbeláez, Fernando Urrea, Carlos Ignacio Urrea, Julio Urrea Jiménez

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published: 29 May 2017

  • Topic: Family Business
  • Industry: Apparel
  • Region: South America

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Abstract:
A well-known lingerie retailer in Colombia, Leonisa is a family-owned company that barely survived a second-generation succession crisis. Brothers Joaquín and Julio Ernesto Urrea founded the firm in 1956, and over 50 years built one of the most recognizable brands in Latin America. While they each had an equal stake in the company, their respective families were not of equal size: Joaquín had 11 children including nine boys, Julio had three daughters. While the girls were interested in design and fashion, the boys were keen to create satellite ventures around the core brand. When one of the co-founders died, a family dispute erupted over whether the dividends should be plowed back into the business or distributed to the shareholders. A mediator obliged the warring branches to reach a settlement that would allow Leonisa to survive. The ousted sisters eventually had their own success story by launching a new business based on their core competencies.

Pedagogical Objectives:
The case offers an opportunity to learn from a family-run company that survived a succession crisis, requiring students to think about family differences from a shareholder point of view, and the role of mediators in saving warring family branches from destroying the firm. It underlines the need for co-founders whose families have different interests to have a long-term plan to prevent a clash of clans. In this instance, one branch got out of the original business and constructed a new business based on their fashion and design skills. Students of family business in Colombia and Latin America will learn lessons from a family dispute that was ultimately resolved.

Keywords:
Leonisa, Ellipse, Urrea, Women’s Underwear, Lingerie, Colombia, Brassieres, Ana Patricia Urrea, Urrea Jiménez, Urrea Arbeláez, Fernando Urrea, Carlos Ignacio Urrea, Julio Urrea Jiménez, Wicfe, Succession, Next Generation, Education, Entrepreneurship, Leadership

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